Module M: Multiple sources of evidence


How can the kids in Mariposa Grove attract monarch caterpillars to their ... Monarch caterpillars must eat milkweed plants as they grow into monarch butterflies.

Module M: Multiple sources of evidence Participant notebook Grade K

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Amplify Science

Module M: Key understandings • Each Amplify Science unit is designed around a phenomenon. Students work as scientists to figure out explanations of their unit’s phenomenon. •

A phenomenon is something observable in the natural world, which one can use science concepts to explain or predict.

• Students leverage multiple modalities as they work. There are coordinated opportunities for students to do, talk, read, write, and visualize. In particular: •

Language and literacy are crucial to the work scientists do. In an Amplify Science unit, there is direct instruction around scientific discourse, scientific writing, and reading informational text.

• Students get multiple chances to construct science concepts before they are expected to master them. Because of this: •

Embedded literacy supports provide students with multiple opportunities to engage in reading and writing. These opportunities support students’ literacy and writing skills, and they build in complexity– allowing students to develop greater independence as they progress through the unit..



Learning sequences are carefully designed. Some activities address similar ideas as previous activities, and this repetition is designed to bring all learners to conceptual understanding.

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Module M: Grade K Participant Notebook

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Amplify Science Approach

Introduction to a real-world problem

What is the phenomenon or problem in the unit?

Collect evidence from multiple sources

Build increasingly complex explanations

Students gather evidence from multiple sources to lead them to science concepts, which they use to build increasingly complex explanations. How do students gather evidence from multiple sources to construct science concepts?

Apply knowledge to a different context

Students apply their knowledge to a different context.

How does multimodal instruction support students in figuring out the solution to the unit problem?

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Multiple modalities in Amplify Science Modality

How it looks in a unit

Do

Students DO science when they engage in hands-on investigation, design and modeling activities, when they work with digital tools, and when they participate in kinesthetic routines.

Talk

Students TALK science through formal discourse routines, but also as they work in pairs to access informational text and use digital tools, and when they participate in full-class discussions, and small group hands-on activities.

Read

Students READ science in their student books and other text-based resources such as projections and copymasters.

Write

Students WRITE science through quick-write opportunities in the Investigation Notebook, full-class Shared Writing activities, and more extended explanation or argument writing opportunities.

Visualize

Each time students strengthen their mental models with support that allow them to see the invisible, they are VISUALIZING science. This happens through diagrams and images in informational texts, representations in digital tools, and kinesthetic routines where students act out processes.

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Module M: Grade K Participant Notebook

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Needs of Plants and Animals

Unit Map

Planning for the Unit

Unit Map How can the kids in Mariposa Grove attract monarch caterpillars to their neighborhood? Students take on the role of scientists in order to figure out why no monarch caterpillars live in the area that was converted from a field to a community vegetable garden. They investigate how plants and animals get what they need to live and grow, and then they make a new plan for the garden that will provide for the needs of monarch caterpillars and produce vegetables for humans.

Chapter 1: Why are there no monarch caterpillars since the Field was made into the Garden? Students figure out: Last year, the Field was a place where monarch caterpillars could live because it had milkweed for them to eat. Now that it is a Garden, there are no monarch caterpillars. The caterpillars cannot live in the Garden because the milkweed they need to eat is not there. Lesson Map How they figure it out: Students learn to make multisensory observations as they go on a science walk to figure out what things live in the neighborhood. By investigating photos of animals eating and animals in their habitats, students construct the idea that animals can only live in a place that has the food they need. They observe and compare two images of Mariposa Grove and its plants—one from a year ago when it was the Field and one taken since it became the Garden. Finally, the class co-constructs an explanation for why monarch caterpillars no longer live in the Garden.

Chapter 2: Why did two milkweed seeds become plants, but the other did not? Students figure out: Ms. Ray planted milkweed seeds in three pots, but nothing grew in one pot. The milkweed seed in that pot did not grow because it did not get water. Plants need water to grow, and they get water from the soil around them by using their roots. How they figure it out: Students watch time-lapse videos in order to investigate what happens when plants grow. They also observe and record the growth of radish seeds and sprouting garlic plants. Students discover different ways to measure the growth of plants. They figure out that plant growth means a plant is getting bigger or adding parts that were not there before. By observing what happens to plants that do and don’t have water, students can explain that plants need water.

Chapter 3: Why do the milkweed plants that get water grow differently? Students figure out: Two of Ms. Ray’s milkweed pots got water, and the seeds in those pots grew. However, the plants grew differently from each other. One plant grew more because it got the light it needed, but the other plant grew less because it did not get the light it needed. Plants need light to live and grow, and they get light with their leaves. How they figure it out: Students investigate a picture of milkweed plants and observe that a plant in the shade did not grow well even though it had water. They plan an investigation to determine whether plants need light to live. Students then measure the growth of sunflower plants that grew in the light versus those that didn’t, and they watch time-lapse videos of plants growing in the dark. Students explain why plants may not grow well even when they get water.

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Amplify Science

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© 2018 The Regents of the University of California

Needs of Plants and Animals

Unit Map

Planning for the Unit

Chapter 4: How can humans make sure that other living things will be able to live and grow? Students figure out: Monarch caterpillars must eat milkweed plants as they grow into monarch butterflies. Humans also need food, but they can grow the food they need. Sometimes when humans grow food, they get rid of certain plants, which might be food for other animals. This is what happened in the Garden. If humans plan a garden that has vegetables and milkweed plants, both humans and monarch caterpillars will get the food they need. How they figure it out: Students read a book about butterfly scientists in Mexico who used what they learned through investigation to encourage people to restore the habitats of monarch caterpillars and butterflies. Students explore photos to learn ways that humans depend on plants. They design a solution to the problem by planning a garden that can meet the needs of both humans and monarchs.

© 2018 The Regents of the University of California

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Module M: Grade K Participant Notebook

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Coherence flowchart structure

Unit title The problem students work to solve

Chapter Question

First investigation question in the chapter

Second investigation question in the chapter

Evidence Sources and Reflection Opportunities

Evidence Sources and Reflection Opportunities

Key Concepts

Key Concepts

Applying back to the problem

The explanation that students can make to answer the chapter question.

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Analyzing coherence Goal: Gain confidence in using a coherence flowchart as a tool to see how ideas build across a chapter. 1.

As a group, use the coherence flowchart for Chapter __ to: a. Discuss the Chapter __ Question. How does it connect to the unit problem and to what students figure out in Chapter __?

b. Discuss the first Investigation Question. How does this question help students answer the chapter question?

2. Individually, use the coherence flowchart and Teacher’s Guide to: a. Consider Evidence Sources and Reflection Opportunities: •

Each group member, choose an activity from the first evidence source/ reflection opportunity box in the coherence flowchart. It is okay if some group members choose the same activity, but make sure that there are a variety of activities chosen. Place a star next to the activity you chose on your coherence flowchart.



In the Teacher’s Guide, navigate to the lesson listed next to your chosen activity and read the Lesson Overview. What is the purpose of the activity you chose to consider?



Navigate to the activity and then read the steps. What do students do in the activity? How does this activity help students figure out or reflect upon the Investigation Question?



Check the Teacher Support notes (if applicable). Do any of the notes help you further understand the purpose of the activity? Are there suggestions for deepening students’ experience with the activity or providing more support?

© 2018 The Regents of the University of California

Module M: Grade K Participant Notebook

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Analyzing coherence cont.

3. As a group, refer to responses in step 2 and to the coherence flowchart for Chapter __ to: a. Discuss Evidence Sources and Reflection Opportunities. •

Each group member, share a brief description of the activity you considered and its purpose.



How do the activities you discussed build on each other and fit together?



How do the activities support the students in answering the Investigation Question?

b. Discuss the transition to the next question:

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Based on what students figured out, what will they be motivated to wonder next?



How does this connect to the next question (Investigation Question or Chapter Question) they work with?

© 2018 The Regents of the University of California

© 2018 The Regents of the University of California

Explanation That Students Can Make to Answer the Chapter 1 Question

Application of Key Concepts to Problem

Key Concepts

Evidence Sources and Reflection Opportunities

• • • • •

• An animal needs to eat food to live. (1.4) • Animals can only live in a place that has the food they need. (1.5)

(1.4) Investigate pictures of animals eating food (1.4) Explore different habitats (1.5) Read about habitats in Handbook of Plants (1.5) Examine images of different habitats (1.5) Explain where animals live (1.5)

• Compare animals in the Field and the Garden

Why can an animal live where it does? (1.4, 1.5)

© 2018 The Regents of the University of California

Last year, the Field was a place where monarch caterpillars could live, because there was milkweed for them to eat there. Now, in the Garden, there are no monarch caterpillars. The caterpillars cannot live in the Garden because the milkweed they need to eat is not there.

• Search for evidence of monarch caterpillars’ food (milkweed) in Field and Garden pictures (1.6) • Explain why monarch caterpillars cannot live in the Garden (1.7)

• Different kinds of plants and animals live in a place. (1.3)

• Read Science Walk (1.1, 1.2) • Sort cards to compare living and nonliving things (1.2) • Observe living things around the school (1.3)

Students use the Chapter 1 Question to frame and motivate their investigations (1.2, 1.3, 1.4)

Why are there no monarch caterpillars since the Field was made into the Garden?

Chapter 1 Question

Investigation Questions

How can the kids in Mariposa Grove attract monarch caterpillars to their neighborhood?

Problem Students Work to Solve

Needs of Plants and Animals: Milkweed and Monarchs

Needs of Plants and Animals: Milkweed and monarchs

Module M: Grade K Participant Notebook

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Amplify Science

Observe differences among milkweed plants (2.7) Write an explanation for why the milkweed plants look different (2.7) Read and complete the first two pages of the mini-book, Milkweed for Monarchs (2.7)

• Plants get the water they need with their roots from the soil around them. (2.6)

• Observe and discuss garlic growth (2.5) • Revisit A Plant in the Desert focusing on roots (2.5) • Observe radish growth (2.6) • Explain that plants can grow where there is water (2.6) • Read about roots in Handbook of Plants (2.6) • Observe radish roots(2.6)

How do plants get the water they need? (2.5, 2.6)

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Ms. Ray planted milkweed seeds in three pots, but in one of the pots, nothing grew. The milkweed seeds in that pot did not grow because they did not get water. Plants need water to grow, and they get water from the soil around them using their roots.

• • •

• Plants need water from the place where they are in order to live and grow. (2.4) • Animals need water from the place where they are in order to live and grow. (2.4)

• Share ideas about plant needs (2.3) • Investigate garlic and radish growth (2.3) • Discuss whether all plants need water (2.4) • Read A Plant in the Desert (2.4) • Discuss plant and animal habitats (2.4) • Explain what plants need (2.4)

• Watch a video of seeds growing (2.1) • Read about plant growth in Handbook of Plants (2.1) • Participate in Plant Growth movement routine. (2.1, 2.2) • Sequence photos of growing plants (2.2) • Complete a How a Plant Grows chart (2.2) • Compare photos of milkweed plants (2.2)

• When plants grow, they get bigger and have new parts that were not there before. (2.2)

Do plants need water to grow? (2.3, 2.4)

What does it look like when plants grow? (2.1, 2.2)

Why did two milkweed seeds become plants, but the other did not?

How can the kids in Mariposa Grove attract monarch caterpillars to their neighborhood?

Needs of Plants and Animals: Milkweed and Monarchs

Needs of Plants and Animals: Milkweed and monarchs

© 2018 The Regents of the University of California

© 2018 The Regents of the University of California

Explanation That Students Can Make to Answer the Chapter 3 Question

Application of Key Concepts to Problem

Key Concepts

Evidence Sources and Reflection Opportunities

Investigation Questions

Chapter 3 Question

Problem Students Work to Solve

Explain why the milkweed plants that get water are growing differently (3.3) Complete two new pages of the mini-book, Milkweed for Monarchs (3.4)

• Plants get the light they need with their leaves. (3.3)

• Observe plants growing toward light in a time-lapse video (3.3) • Read more about light in Handbook of Plants (3.3) • Revisit the Plant Growth movement routine (3.3) • Read Above and Below (3.4)

How do plants get light? (3.3)

© 2018 The Regents of the University of California

Two of Ms. Ray’s milkweed pots did get water, and the seeds grew in both of those pots. However, those plants grew differently from each other. One plant grew more because it got the light it needed, and the other plant grew less because it did not get the light it needed. Plants need light to live and grow, and they get light with their leaves.

• •

• Plants need light to live and grow. (3.2)

• Set up light investigation (3.1) • Observe sunflowers grown with and without light (3.1) • Discuss whether all plants need light (3.2) • Read about plants and light in Handbook of Plants (3.2) • Add light to Plant Growth movement routine (3.2) • Explain that plants need light (3.2)

Do plants need light to live and grow? (3.1, 3.2)

Why do the milkweed plants that get water grow differently?

How can the kids in Mariposa Grove attract monarch caterpillars to their neighborhood?

Needs of Plants and Animals: Milkweed and Monarchs

Needs of Plants and Animals: Milkweed and monarchs

Module M: Grade K Participant Notebook

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Amplify Science

Explanation That Students Can Make to Answer the Chapter 4 Question

Application of Key Concepts to Problem

Key Concepts

Evidence Sources and Reflection Opportunities

Investigation Question

Chapter 4 Question

Problem Students Work to Solve

• • •

• What scientists learn about living things can help people make choices about what to do. (4.2) • Humans can make choices so that other living things can get what they need. (4.3)

Write about how to make the Garden a place where monarchs can live (4.3) Explain which plants to put in the Garden (4.3) Discuss the plan for the Garden (4.4)

Read Investigating Monarchs (4.1) Discuss monarch habitats (4.1) Complete mini-books (4.1) Revisit Investigating Monarchs (4.2) Discuss what humans needs to live (4.2)

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Like other animals, humans need food, but humans can grow the food they need. Sometimes when humans grow food, they get rid of other plants, which might be food for other animals. This is what happened in the Garden. Humans can help monarch caterpillars get what they need. If there are vegetables and milkweed plants in the Garden, humans and monarch caterpillars can have the food they need.

• • • • •

How can humans make sure that other living things can live and grow? (4.2, 4.3)

How do we make the Garden a place where monarch caterpillars can live again?

How can the kids in Mariposa Grove attract monarch caterpillars to their neighborhood?

Needs of Plants and Animals: Milkweed and Monarchs

Needs of Plants and Animals: Milkweed and monarchs

© 2018 The Regents of the University of California

Needs of Plants and Animals Unit essentials

and instructional builds Part 1: Unit essentials Read Table 1: Unit essentials to learn about instructional essentials in the Needs of Plants and Animals unit. For more information about specific unit essentials, navigate to the resources listed in the fourth column. Table 1: Unit essentials Unit essential

Description of unit essential

In Needs of Plants and Animals:

For more information, look at:

Unit type

Amplify Science elementary units have four types: Investigation, Modeling, Design, and Argumentation

Investigation

Overview: Standards and Goals

Focal practice

The focal practice is often the same as the Unit Type, but not always. In the vertical build of the Amplify Science Elementary program, different focal aspects of the focal practice are introduced as students progress through the program.

Planning and Carrying Out Investigations Focus: recording observations as data to answer questions

Discourse Routine

Each Grade K and 1 unit supports students’ oral language development with a Shared Listening Discourse Routine. Shared Listening supports students with communicating in the way that scientists do through a combination of active listening and speaking.

Taking Turns

Sense-Making Strategy

Each Amplify Science Setting a Purpose unit equips students with a strategy for making meaning of what they learn. Students practice using this strategy in readingfocused and sciencefocused activities.

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Lesson 1.1, Activity 2: Teacher Support tab: Literacy Note: Discourse Routines

Lesson 1.1, Activity 3: Teacher Support tab: Literacy Note: Setting a Purpose

Module M: Grade K Participant Notebook

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Needs of Plants and Animals: Unit essentials and instructional builds

Unit essential Writing Genre

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Amplify Science

Description of unit essential

In Needs of Plants and Animals:

Elementary Amplify Explanation Science units develop students’ skills in two writing genres: explanation and argumentation. For grades K-1, oral language practice and rehearsal provides the foundation for students’ written work.

For more information, look at: Lesson 1.5, Activity 4: Teacher Support tab: Pedagogical Goals: Constructing Oral Explanations

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Needs of Plants and Animals: Unit essentials and instructional builds Part 2: Analyzing instructional builds 1.

Analyze the examples listed in Table 2: Instructional builds by navigating to the activities listed, reading them, and comparing them.

2. Record what you notice about how the instructional essential builds in complexity and independence in the “What I Notice” column.

Table 2: Instructional builds Unit Essential

Early-in-Unit Example

Later-in-Unit Example

Unit Type/ Focal Practice

Lesson 1.3, Activity 1

Lesson 3.1, Activity 3

Discourse Routine

Lesson 1.1, Activity 2

Lesson 4.2, Activity 3

SenseMaking Strategy: Reading

Lesson 1.1, Activity 3

Lesson 4.1, Activity 1

Writing Genre

Lesson 1.6, Activity 3

Lesson 4.3, Activity 3

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What I Notice How does students’ engagement build in complexity? Independence?

Module M: Grade K Participant Notebook

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Needs of Plants and Animals: Unit essentials and instructional builds Part 3: Reflecting on instructional builds Refer to Table 1: Unit essentials and Table 2: Instructional builds to answer the questions below. You may also want to refer to the Multiple modalities in the Amplify Science table to answer question 1.

1. How do these unit essentials support students to engage in multiple modalities?

2. How do these unit essentials support students’ literacy skills?

3. How do these unit essentials incorporate opportunities for partner and small group work to support student learning?

4. How do these unit essentials support ALL learners (English language learners, students with special needs, etc.)?

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Amplify Science

© 2018 The Regents of the University of California

NYSSLS reference sheet

3-D learning engages students in using scientific and engineering practices and applying crosscutting concepts as tools to develop understanding of and solve challenging problems related to disciplinary core ideas.

Science and Engineering Practices 1. Asking Questions and Defining Problems

5. Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking

2. Developing and Using Models

6. Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions

3. Planning and Carrying Out Investigations

7. Engaging in Argument from Evidence

4. Analyzing and Interpreting Data

8. Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information

Disciplinary Core Ideas Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1: E  arth’s Place in the Universe ESS2: Earth’s Systems ESS3: E  arth and Human Activity

Life Sciences: LS1: From Molecules to Organisms LS2: Ecosystems LS3: Heredity LS4: Biological Evolution

Physical Sciences: PS1: M  atter and its Interactions PS2: Motion and Stability PS3: Energy PS4: Waves and their Applications

Engineering, Technology and the Applications of Science: ETS1: Engineering Design ETS2:Links among Engineering Technology, Science and Society

Crosscutting Concepts 1. Patterns

5. Energy and Matter

2. Cause and Effect

6. Structure and Function

3. Scale, Proportion, and Quantity

7. Stability and Change

4. Systems and System Models

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Module M: Grade K Participant Notebook

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Analyzing 3-D learning 1.

Navigate to the Unit Guide documents for your unit. Click to open the 3-D Statements document.

2. Analyze 3-D learning in your unit by reading through the 3-D statements for Chapter __. 3. Use the table to make notes about 3-D learning through the chapter. You do not need to write about every lesson, rather comment on pieces that stick out to you. 4. Reflect on the 3-D learning you read about to answer the reflection questions below the table.

Summarize the science concepts (related to grade-level DCIs) students construct in the chapter.

What Practices do students engage with in the chapter?

What Crosscutting Concepts do students use to make sense of what they’re learning in the chapter?

1. How does 3-D learning support students in gathering evidence from multiple sources? __________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________

2. How does engaging in multiple modalities (Do, Talk, Read, Write, and Visualize) support 3-D learning? __________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________

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Notes

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Module M: Grade K Participant Notebook

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Notes

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Amplify Science

© 2018 The Regents of the University of California

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