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UndErSTAnding cHAriSMA. INTERVIEW WITH OLIVIA FOx CABANE. wHy HEAring gOOd nEwS Or BAd. nEwS firST rEAlly MATTErS. By ART MARKMAN PH.D.

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ISSUE 33

Interview with

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How to Engage

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Inspire Your team and

Contents Start with One Small Step

By Christele Canard

Why Hearing Good News or Bad News First REALLY Matters

By Art Markman Ph.D.

How to Engage and Inspire Your Team

Interview with Chris Atkinson

Understanding Charisma

Interview with Olivia Fox Cabane

How People Analytics Is Redefining the Way We Work, Live, and Play

By Suzanna Colberg

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Why Leaders Should Create Meaningful Environments

BY INSEAD Knowledge

Compassion in Leadership

by Jim Bouchard

Leadership Hacks

with Christele Canard

Did You Know?

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A Word From the Founder:

Start with One Small Step “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” – Lao-tzu Have you ever wanted to begin a major project or make a lifestyle change, and spent the rest of the time, thinking, procrastinating and hesitating rather than taking action? There comes a time when you are better off taking action rather than continue thinking it through. A great way to overcome fear, procrastination and uncertainty, is to take one small step.

By chunking done a large task into smaller achievable steps, you overcome the mental block that it’s too big to handle. Just Do It “Do. Or do not. There is no try.” - The Empire Strikes Back The best time to start is now. Don’t over think it. Don’t wait for the conditions to be perfect. That time will never come. Just take one small step…the next step.

Focus on the Next Step

Confidence Grows with Each Step You Take

“The secret of getting ahead is getting started. The secret of getting started is breaking your complex overwhelming tasks into small manageable tasks, and starting on the first one.” Mark Twain

“Inaction breeds doubt and fear. Action breeds confidence and courage. If you want to conquer fear, do not sit home and think about it. Go out and get busy.” Dale Carnegie

When you focus on the task at hand, it can seem daunting and perhaps even insurmountable. That’s why it helps to identify and focus on the next step, no matter how small that might be.

As you take action, no matter how small, your sense of accomplishment increases. This in turn provides the motivation to take the next step.

Whether you are starting a new project, writing a book, or wanting to get fit, every accomplishment is made up of a series of small steps.

Commit to doing one thing…take the next step…and then the next… and the next. Take that small step and do it often.

Christele

Christele Canard Founder, Switched On Leadership Switched

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Why Hearing Good News or Bad News First Really Matters By Art Markman Ph.D.

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hether we want to hear the positive or the negative first says a lot about us.

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Many situations in life involve a doubleedged sword that carries good news

and bad news: A promotion at work may come with an increase in salary but also more responsibilities and longer hours. A workplace evaluation may involve both praise for jobs well done as well as suggestions for improvement. �

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This issue was explored in an interesting paper in the March, 2014 issue of Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin by Angela Legg and Kate Sweeny. In an initial study, participants filled out a personality inventory. One group was told that they were going to get feedback, some of which was good and some of which was bad, and were asked which they wanted to hear first. A second group was told that they were going to give someone else feedback about their personality inventory and that some of the news would be good

Whether we want to hear the positive or the negative first says a lot about us.

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and some bad. They were asked what news they wanted to deliver first. Most people (78%) wanted to hear the bad news first, followed by the good news, because they believed they would feel better if they got the bad news out of the way and ended on a good note. People delivering news, though, were split: Those who imagined what a recipient would want to hear tended to want to give the bad news first, while those who focused on their own feelings tended to want to give the good news first, because they felt it would be easier to start by giving good news. A second study focused on participants delivering news. In this study, participants who were instructed to think about how the other person would feel when getting the news were � Photo credit:©Oleg Dudko/123RF.com

When you are about to get a shot of good and bad news, what is your preference − good news first, or bad? And what should your preference be?

more prone to give the bad news first and then the good, compared to those in a control condition who were not given any specific instructions. But which is actually better for us, getting good news first or bad? A third study suggests that the answer to this important question depends on whether you are focused on your mood or on changing your behavior. In this study, participants filled out a personality inventory and then were given bogus feedback about their results. The feedback consisted both of good news (some positive personality traits like being a good leader) as well as bad news (some traits that are not so positive, like being low in creativity). The study varied the order in which participants got this feedback--and before and after getting the feedback, participants rated their degree of worry, as well as their mood. After getting the feedback, participants rated how committed they

Art Markman Ph.D. Art Markman is a professor of Psychology and Marketing at the University of Texas and Founding Director of the Program in the Human Dimensions of Organizations. He has

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were to learning to change the negative aspects of their personality. At the end of the study, participants had the option of watching some videos to help them make personality changes or helping the experimenter by stapling some packets together. Participants who got the bad news first were in a better mood and were less worried overall than those who got the good news first. However, participants who got the bad news first were less interested in changing their behavior, and were less likely to elect to watch videos to improve their behavior, than those who got the good news first. Overall, we like to get improving sequences of news (bad news first) because the last thing you hear affects you mood. However, it turns out that being a little unsettled can be motivating. So, if you are motivated to act on the bad feedback by making changes in your behavior, it is better to focus on what is wrong, and to hear it last. ■ written over 150 scholarly papers on topics including reasoning, decision making, and motivation. He brings insights from cognitive science to a broader audience through his blogs at Psychology Today, Fast Company, and Inc as well as his radio show and podcast Two Guys on Your Head produced by KUT in Austin. Art is the author of several books including Smart Thinking, Smart Change, and Habits of Leadership. His next book, Brain Briefs will be published in October, 2016.

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ISSUE 9 Think CriTiCally i influenCe Profoundly i innovaTe like an enTrePreneur

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Interview with Chris Atkinson

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CC: Hello and welcome to

Switched On Leadership, I’m Christele Canard and I have great pleasure in introducing my guest today Chris Atkinson. Chris is an international business speaker and author who combines a strong commercial approach with a deep understanding of human psychology. He has qualifications in the fields of psychology and counselling from the University of Bristol, in the UK. Starting his speaking career in 2001, Chris has now worked in over 22 Switched

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countries worldwide with more than 43 different nationalities. He has spoken in front of an estimated 30,000 people worldwide. He is renowned as a speaker, master trainer and facilitator who specializes in audience engagement, organizational culture and inspiring leadership. His new book, Corporate Energy: How to Engage and Inspire Audiences is due for release on the 26th of August. Chris, welcome to Switched On Leadership.

CA: Great to speak with you, hello. �

CC: Chris, I am interested in what drives you. What’s the impact you are hoping to make in the world?

CA: As you mentioned in your

introduction, I’ve worked with a lot of people over many years. When I reflect on all those people that I have worked with (all of which was in the commercial world) I wonder how many felt passion for their work or even enjoyed it at a minimum standard. Even if we estimate that fifty percent of the people that I’ve worked with enjoyed their job – which I believe is probably significantly too high – it is still a horrifying thought.

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Imagine, all these people spending all day long in their office, doing something that isn’t somehow satisfying them, or enriching their life in some way. To me that is fundamentally depressing. It is worrying and it feels dysfunctional in some way. So the impact I hope to make in the world is: I want to help people connect with some passion and enjoyment for working life.

CC: Yes, I agree. We spend so much

time at work, that it can be souldestroying if you cannot connect to �

a deeper meaning or purpose. I think it’s a great cause. What is your key message Chris? What would you like to see happen for listeners as a result of this interview?

CA: My fundamental belief is that the

job isn’t the problem here. This isn’t about the nature of work itself. It would be easy for people to say, “I work in this industry…” or “I do this type of work, so how am I going to find pleasure?” Maybe that’s a misinterpretation that everyone should be bouncing into work every day. I’m not going that far. What I’m saying rather, is that it’s an issue of corporate culture and attitude. I’ve seen teams and people find pleasure and satisfaction – even excitement – from the most challenging or seemingly monotonous roles. I’ve worked with water companies with teams of people who deal with our waste water and they are literally doing the grimiest, toughest job you could imagine. I’ve worked with these teams of people who absolutely love what it is that they do. They feel like they are heroes going out doing the work that no one else wants to do. They take huge pride in their work. I do a lot of work in the automotive industry. People who work in the manufacturing side of the automotive industry often have jobs where they have seconds to do their job before the manufacturing line moves on. Your job is to repeat the same process, every 20, 30 or 40 seconds. You can imagine that being monotonous, but somehow when Switched

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companies get it right – the culture, the attitude of the people, the camaraderie of the staff – it makes it work. So it’s not about the job. It’s about the culture and the attitude of people. That’s the message I want to get across.

CC: The focus of your book is on

“engaging and inspiring” audiences. Some people however think that “work is work.” Why do you think inspiration and engagement are so important? Why should business leaders give it serious consideration?

CA: I’m going to be careful not to get

on a soapbox here. This is an issue that I have a fundamental challenge with. I mostly work with senior teams and executive level within organizations. These people are making hard-edged, �

It’s not about the job. It’s about the culture and the attitude of people.

commercial decisions about the future for their organizations. These decisions often involve an investment of millions of dollars or significant sums of money. Imagine if I sat around that boardroom and I said, “We’ve got this new technology and we believe it can increase your profitability by 12%” or “We have evidence to show that it increases productivity of your workforce by 18%” or “We have a new customer relationship software, and it can increase your customer satisfaction by 12%.” Would the board of a company be interested in some technology that could achieve those results? I’d be damn sure they would. I think they would jump on it. These are the exact statistics Gallup found when they looked at 263 different studies of engagement, covering 1.4 million employees. A massive piece of research, looking at thousands of different organizations and people across loads of different countries. What they found is a 12% Switched

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increase in customer satisfaction; 18% increase in productivity; 12% increase in profitability. They found 147% higher earnings per share for organizations that have high engagement. What I don’t understand is, when I sit in front of boards and talk to them about the importance of investing in increasing employee engagement, why it feels like an uphill battle? My feeling is that if I was offering them a piece of software, or a technology solution, or some new process, they would jump on it. They would probably make millions of dollars available. The investment in IT infrastructure is huge. And those are only the positive benefits – things it improves. You can even look at it from the other side – things it reduces. Safety issues: reduced by 62%. Reductions in staff turnover. In the UK we have a publicly funded body called ACAF. They looked at the cost of replacing a single employee. They estimated that the cost of replacing a single employee was thirty thousand UK pounds. That was based on 28 weeks of lost productivity, estimated as one of the costs incurred whilst the new person comes on board. That’s £30,000 per employee. In the Gallup survey, they found that for high or low turnover organizations, it can be anywhere between a thirty to fifty percent reduction of staff turnover. You can put real numbers on these figures. You could literally calculate what they would mean for any given organization. I think these issues should be considered with a high level of importance at a corporate and �

strategic level. Yet somehow they tend to get overlooked. Managers are being driven very hard by their bosses, and they want to get the best from their teams. All of the research and data is saying that highly engaged people – people who are inspired and motivated in their work – deliver measurable, quantitatively different returns for their organization. So to me, it’s a commercial topic as well as an emotional one.

CC: We can’t ignore those figures.

going to be either or. There are certainly different levels at which this can happen. The easiest level is at the level of corporate culture. If you can define a culture where people are encouraged and supported; where you are actively seeking the best positions for each person in order to get the most out of them. Again, Gallop has a lot of investment in the strengths based approach. We know that a strengths based approach also drives engagement. This is where people are playing towards the things they are good at, rather than having a performance management system where you go, “What are you not good at? Well, you need to improve that.” This generally puts people on a negative cycle. �

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Regarding the employees, you mentioned earlier, that were inspired by their work. How much of that was due to the corporate culture and how much to the individual?

CA: The answer is probably not

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On one level, if you can get the culture right – then as people are coming into the organization – they are almost indoctrinated into this positive environment. And it becomes self-sustaining. However, lots of clients I work with are simply too large to be able to make that kind of shift culturally. So what you end up with are pockets of high engagement, and divisions that outperform other divisions. When you look at those divisions (and in answer to your question, how did that happen?) – what you will normally find is a leader. Normally somebody, with some influence in the organization, has taken that team or that division and gone “right, this is how I want it to be in this area.” They kind of made it happen, almost like in a protective bubble from the rest of the organization. Switched

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I’ve seen this over and over again in my career. One or two leaders within a larger organization who have managed to shelter their people and create the culture that they wanted. And those people deliver. They really deliver great results.

CC: That’s encouraging. Even

if you are not the head of the organization you can still have a tremendous impact on raising the engagement of your team and your colleagues.

CA: Yes. If I could add to that. You’ve

got to remember, organizations are basically built around metrics and measures. One way or another, you are being almost purely evaluated on your deliverables. It would be nice to think that there’s also the softer side…and the �

For me, inspiration came most strongly from research by two researchers called Zenger and Folkman. They are very big in the area of positive psychology and strength-based Therefore, if you are a manager or approach. They looked at 30,000 leader – as long as you are reporting managers and took feedback from the figures and the numbers that 300,000 of the peer group. What they the wider organization requires from were interested in, which I think was your team or department – what you wonderfully controversial, was the do within your department can be a bottom 1%. They looked at the worst little bit more creative and disruptive. performing people. They To some extent, I would wanted to see whether even encourage you to there were characteristics challenge the boundaries that were seen only of your organizational in the bottom 1%. processes. There will Characteristics that be certain things that we don’t see in will be understood True inspiration is a function other mangers. that you can’t do, They wanted to but generally if you of your authenticity. find what they call are delivering results the fatal flaws. The there is a lot more absolute fatal flaws of tolerance. I would managers. They came say, report out of up with a top ten list. your department what You can find this online. It’s is required, but how you a great study. structure and manage your team internally shouldn’t be defined Number one on their list – the number by the wider organization. You can take one thing out of everything that people some risk there. could say about the failings of the bottom one percent – was a failure to CC: What makes a person inspire people, because of a lack of inspirational? Is it something that energy and enthusiasm. can be taught? more positive organizations do have that. But for the most part, you are being measured on an output.

CA: Inspiration is the other half of

the engagement bit. Engagement is my feeling towards my work. And then the complementary part is, I have a manager, or a boss, or a leader who inspires me. When the leader is inspirational – engagement tends to sort of match. The two are complementary to each other. Switched

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And so for me this is a really key topic. Sometimes I think we pick the wrong role models when we think about whether someone is inspirational. We have quite a US centric view of what inspirational or motivational speakers are like. It is very heavily influenced by the media exposure that speakers in the US tend to get. �

The big on-stage, extroverted character is only one small subset of how people are inspired. When you actually look at what inspires people, you find that true inspiration is a function of your authenticity. In my book, I spend a lot of time talking about this. It’s not a function of how extroverted you are, or how over-thetop, or even how impressive you are. It’s about how authentic you are. To what extent you are able to speak from the heart. That’s something people overlook when they think about whether they can be inspirational.

And if they are both you, why are you different? You are you. So it’s as if you are hiding one part of yourself from one or either of those circumstances. We take that almost entirely for granted. The other thing is, I’m not sure to what extent in organizations we have a culture where people are open and emotional in front of their colleagues. You can’t inspire someone unless you are yourself being emotional. You can’t inspire people through intellect. It is an �

So can it be taught? Yes of course. If anything, it’s about dropping the mask a little bit. Which is being more yourself.

CC: I don’t know how easy that is

for people to do sometimes. What suggestions would you have to get people to be more authentic?

CA: Yes, I think the issue is that it’s

We have created, I suppose, professional lives that don’t look like our home life. It’s not uncommon for someone to say, “I’m a different person at work than I am at home.” We don’t even think that that is a surprising or a shocking thing to say. When you stop to think about it, that’s not okay actually. What do you mean you are a different person? Which one is you and which one is not you? Or are they both you? Switched

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easier said than done. You are right to observe that.

You can’t inspire people through intellect. It is an emotional experience.

emotional experience. I don’t know to what extent we have organizations that are open to people speaking emotions. Maybe you get anger or frustration, when people thump a table or shout at a team member. I don’t know that we have that level of openness. So in terms of practical advice, I would say it’s a little bit about less of some things and more of the others. Firstly, let’s discuss the less. We need to have less difference between who we are at home and at work. That distinction is from a business culture of days gone by. That time has gone now. And now for the more. The more authentic you are, the more you show people you work with who you are, the more likely they will trust and respect you. Why not talk about yourself as the person you are…the good, the bad and the challenges you have? Be a whole person. The fact that we segregate bits of our life that we do not expose to our colleagues, in some ways diminishes the level of trust they have in us, because Switched

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they don’t know us. I’m not suggesting you expose your deepest, darkest secrets, or you bring inappropriate material into the workplace. Brené Brown has the most amazing Ted Talk. If you go online and look for it, you’ll see it has millions of hits. She talks about the power of vulnerability. What she says is, when people speak from the heart and risk vulnerability by showing emotions, other people then trust in them. They connect with you. In that space between people, is where inspiration tends to live. That’s the inspiration part, but I do want to also address the engagement part. Within the engagement part is one other “more.” And that is, you do need a bit more energy and enthusiasm in the way that you speak to people. I think the assumption is that when I am speaking or presenting to my team, it should be a very comfortable experience. But actually that’s not the truth of it. When I finish presenting or I finish facilitating an event, I’m exhausted. I’m totally shattered. It’s a full-on physical experience. My whole body, my mind, my voice…I’m pushing myself as much as I can. It’s a form of athleticism to keep your energy level high, whilst paying attention to the audience. I just wonder whether leaders appreciate that this process that we are speaking about, should be effortful. It should take significant effort. You should sit down feeling exhausted. If after having spoken to your team, you are not exhausted when you sit down, you have probably not put enough into it. �

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CC: Yes, it does take a lot of focus,

a lot of effort. And I agree with you, the most powerful thing we can do is show our vulnerability. After all, we don’t like “perfect people.” There is something strange about people that pretend to be perfect.

CA: Human instinct would suggest that

if I show vulnerability, I’m showing you weakness. Therefore, you will think I am weak, especially if I am a leader. Why would I expose what I consider to be a negative trait…my vulnerability? I would venture that where we are heading in the modern world is towards the premise that when you are vulnerable, people trust you more. Switched

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They are more willing to open up to you about their vulnerability. You build stronger, deeper relationships. And then you get the performance benefits.

CC: When you share your

vulnerability people connect with you on a deeper level. I think speakers have tapped into that but not necessarily leaders within organizations.

CA: Yes, absolutely. Maybe what I

should emphasize is the idea that if I’m delivering a presentation then of course I would put more energy into it. Leaders are very little if not speakers. You could argue that if you are not speaking – you are probably doing the work. And if �

you are doing the work – you probably haven’t delegated enough. As a leader, the best thing you can do is to fully empower your team to do as much of the job. If you are doing the work, you are probably thinking, “Why am I doing this?” The principle should be to work through the team as much as possible and be a support for the team. And in that circumstance, what are you if not a communicator? That’s all you are doing. You’re right, it’s perhaps easier for people to imagine that when they are onstage they would turn it on. But this isn’t about that. This is about the daily briefings; the weekly meetings; when you are just chatting to people and talking to them about their job. In these instances, how are you communicating? If I had to put money on it, my bet would be that you are communicating in the following way. How are you doing against your target? Are you going to get that report in on time? Can you review this for me? Totally unemotional; totally practical. Treating people like a robot. Focused on whether they are working right. Are you functional right now? Rather than what we’ve been talking about, which is quite a different conversation.

CC: What skills do leaders need to

have in order to engage and inspire?

CA: That is a relatively large

question, but what I can say in simple terms is it definitely lies within the communications skills set. This whole topic and everything that I have written in the book, is a lot harder Switched

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to implement if you are not firstly comfortable standing in front of people. You don’t have to be the extrovert but you have to be able to stand in front of people and be in control of body language, nerves, and those types of things. That’s a fundamental. You need good questioning skills, which is strongly linked to coaching. It’s also easier if you are a facilitator rather than a “tell” person. It takes a level of risktaking to do things like story-telling and creativity. You integrate these skills into a package, and that package becomes your communication style.

CC: What’s one tip that we could implement tomorrow, that would help us in this area?

CA: I’m going to give you one and

a half tips! The simplest tip, and it’s the most obvious really, is to turn off technology. PowerPoint is the enemy of this topic. Our default communication style in organizations has become slides. And what you commonly get when you have a slideshow, is a leader who stands up and narrates a series of slides. When you stop and think about it, how crazy is it that we have all these leaders who just stand and narrate slideshows. Then we hand over to the next person who stands and narrates their slideshow. In the book I say, if everything you are going to say is on the slide, just cancel the meeting. Save everyone some time, just send them the slides. There’s no point you standing and presenting the slides. People can read it quicker and more conveniently in their own time. �

There is an idea in the academic world called “flipped classroom.” What they try and do in flipped classroom is send out the reading in advance. The classroom then becomes this dynamic, conversation environment. It puts a bit of responsibility on the people, because if you haven’t done the reading, then of course you don’t get the value. And maybe that’s what we don’t trust, and why we use PowerPoint so much.

PowerPoint are there any other big mistakes we make in this area? I’m sure there are a few. What are the most common?

CA: Okay, if we are going for the

most common mistakes, then we are moving in a slightly different direction, content wise. I watch a lot of leaders and the most common mistakes are actually around body language issues and voice tone. People not appreciating the impact that their total communication is having.

Stop getting people to stand up and just present their metrics and measures. Start having a conversation with people. Start having It sounds like a When you are vulnerable, a dialogue. That is really small thing. for me the number Or maybe it sounds people trust you more. one tip. But I did like a basic thing, have a half tip. Once but the reality you have turned is, when you go PowerPoint off, and and watch a lot of you are discussing and leaders, they seem to talking with people – then be fidgeting and they talk more from the heart. Talk don’t look comfortable. They more about your feelings and how tend to move around instead of you are experiencing things, and where standing still. Generally, if you want your concerns are. Ask people where to communicate, you don’t want to their concerns are. Get away from just be shuffling around, or moving sidetalking about the numbers and the to-side, or pacing up and down like a outputs. You’ll find there is a whole caged lion. conversation existing in your team that you just don’t know about. You’ve People tend to look at the screen. Again got no access to it because you have this is partially linked to the PowerPoint never had that conversation before. issue. People tend to look at their slides. But it’s there. It’s there right now, today! And then if they are looking at their People have all of these concerns, fears, slides, they go one step further and worries, and assumptions. We just don’t read from their slides. Like the world’s access that knowledge. worse teleprompter. I’m going to have a teleprompter, but I’m going to let you see it. I’m not even going to try and CC: Yes, that’s true. That’s hide it. I’m actually going to turn and � powerful. I like that. Besides Switched

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read it in front of you. To me that is really shocking! I discuss body language, tone of voice, how you should stand, and how you should use your voice in the book. I do recognize that for a lot of people that may feel like basic things. If you want one thing that connects more strongly to the idea of corporate energy, it would be to stop talking at people. Stop lecturing at people, and start involving them. Start discussing and exploring ideas with them, rather than telling them things. That would be the big mistakes I see.

CC: Would you do that by asking

quality questions?

CA: Yes…if you are taking a facilitation

approach. That is probably the strongest Switched

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entry point into this whole area. The other techniques, like showmanship and inspiring people through your experiences, are quite advanced techniques. I do recognize they take practice. The easiest entry point is to be a great facilitator. Those skills are completely consistent with coaching skills – ask rather than tell. Learn to ask good questions. But who thinks they are bad at questioning? It sounds like the most basic 101 Level Communication’s subject. It isn’t. If you listen to most questions that people ask, it goes like this: Do you…? Can you…? Have you…? Is that because…? Are there…? All of these closed questions are filled with your assumption. You are essentially leading the audience into giving �

you the answer that you think. They are not good questions. When you say, “is that because you don’t have enough time?” you are suggesting they don’t have enough time. “Can you do it differently? Is there some way you can improve the process?” You are making suggestions. You are not really coaching or facilitating. You are leading.

lot of self-reflection and thinking about how others are responding to our message. I’m not sure if in business, people are thinking enough in this way.

CA: No and I suppose you also have

to consider what level of feedback you are getting, and to what extent you can be sure that you are getting honest feedback.

At one level, when I am standing and presenting alongside a slideshow, probably 70% of my focus is going to be on the slideshow and not on the audience, which is a fundamental mistake. Ask yourself: am a reading my �

Photo credit:©rawpixel/123RF.com

So yes, it is tied to facilitation. It’s a great way in. These skills are wonderful to master. To be a great questioner will certainly help you in any leadership career. But don’t assume they are easy. It takes years of practice to make it really clean and sharp.

CC: It feels like this requires a

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audience? In meetings many people have their laptops open. Are they doing their emailing? If so, why are we all here? Or are they checking their phone? Or are they looking bored? A lot of times, managers and leaders don’t seem to respond when they see people looking bored. Or maybe that’s Switched

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the reason for my book. Maybe they just don’t know what to do to change it. So they think, “Well I’ll just carry on, because I don’t know what to do.” And then of course you have to question whether you are getting honest feedback. You could look at



360-degree assessment or something like that. Some way by which you can independently ask people – with no fear of reprisals – how you are doing. Certainly, feedback is the lifeblood of leadership. Constantly checking. How am I doing? What do you need from me? What can I do more of? What can I do less of? If you trust your people to be honest, just ask them. Don’t spend the money on surveys. I would do a quality check every few years. Some sort of 360-degree assessment, just to make sure I’m not deluded in some way.

CC: Yes, it’s easy to delude

ourselves. I’m going to give you a plug for your book, because just reading your book will make us think about all the things we can be doing differently. And if we are not doing the things you are suggesting, then we need to consider what impression we are making. Are we inspiring and engaging others or disengaging them and boring them to tears?

CA: That’s my hope for the book, that

it makes a real difference to the people who read it, and therefore their teams, and with luck, their whole organization. That’s the aspiration for sure.

CC: Chris, what’s one final piece

of advice you would like to leave listeners?

CA: I would say that there is a tension

in organizations between management and leadership. The desire to control, measure, incentivize, and punish, is Switched

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aligned with management. This topic, which we have been discussing, around freedom, growth, happiness, and getting people engaged in their work, is much more aligned with leadership. The corporate world is changing. I don’t believe that people will be satisfied with staying in a job when they are not enjoying themselves. And for that reason, the final piece of advice is, if you don’t find a way to challenge your behavior, you are going to end up looking like a dinosaur in the organization. We all have that fear, that as we progress in our careers, we are going to look like the old bloke who was out of touch when we were the young recruit. My final piece of advice: you have to consider the level of input that you are giving people, of yourself. We are way beyond seeing organizations as machinery. That was a view from the last century, even longer. We have to start to evolve our thinking. Turn off PowerPoint; get talking to people; start talking about different topics; start revealing more of yourself; start involving them in conversation. These are not difficult things to do. They just require a change in behavior.

CC: You are right. It is best to start now rather than wait until we are forced to change.

CA: It can only be great for your

career. The sooner you get onto this stuff, the sooner you are going to see people responding differently. Your team will start to get noticed. You’ll �

start to get noticed. Even from a purely selfish point of view, it’s a better tactic.

CC: And I think it’s a far more

enjoyable, fulfilling way to work. It creates a much nicer environment.

CA: I hope so. CC: Where can listeners go to find

out more about you and your book?

CA: The book has its own website. We

have some sample chapters so people can get a feel for the tone of the book. We’ve got some free downloads, videos and all sorts of things. The easiest way to find all that is to go to my website which is www.chris-atkinson.co.uk. You can find all the links there. You can go through to the book from there.

You can also find other things I have written and some videos of me speaking. That’s the place to go. You can order the book from there as well as Amazon.

CC: Brilliant. Thank you Chris for

sharing your valuable insights. As leaders it’s important we take responsibility for inspiring and engaging our team. And as you so eloquently explained there is a real commercial reason for us to do so. Your book Corporate Energy, is not only insightful but I found it comprehensive. And the best thing is its filled with practical tips and techniques anyone can apply straight away. Chris thank you for your time today.

CA: Thank you so much. ■ business sectors in over 22 countries worldwide with more than 43 different nationalities. He has spoken in front of an estimated 30,000 people worldwide.

Chris Atkinson Chris Atkinson is an international business speaker and author who combines a strong commercial approach with a deep understanding of human psychology. He has qualifications in the fields of psychology and counselling from the University of Bristol, UK. Starting his speaking career in 2001, Chris has now worked with diverse

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He is renowned as a speaker, master trainer and facilitator who specializes in audience engagement, organizational culture and inspiring leadership. Chris has been featured on the front covers of international publications and has written numerous magazine articles with a readership covering the UK, Europe, North America and Australia. His latest book, Corporate Energy: How to Engage and Inspire Audiences is due for release on the 26th of August.

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Understanding Charisma

An interview with Olivia Fox Cabane

Question: All organizations need

effective leadership at all levels and in all areas. How best to develop that leadership?

Cabane: The one perspective that

I can bring to the table is on how leaders can be charismatic; high charisma can certainly be useful in effective leadership. There are Switched

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costs to be borne depending on what sorts of charisma you want to wield. Effective leaders need to understand what sort of charisma they’ve got, and the costs associated with that. A good leader might want to enhance their natural form of charisma or develop alternative forms, appropriate to the costs that they think are acceptable. �

Question: What is the single biggest

common misconceptions about charisma? What in fact is true?

inhibitor to charisma?

Cabane: Long believed to be

known as self-doubt. In one of its manifestations, known as the “impostor

an innate, magical quality − the original Greek root χάρισμα refers to a gift of divine grace−charisma has in recent years come under the scrutiny of sociologists, psychologists, and cognitive, behavioral, and even neuroscientists who have found that, far from being an innate, magical quality, charisma is simply the result of learned behaviors. In fact, in controlled laboratory experiments, researchers were able to raise and lower people’s levels of charisma as if they were turning a dial just by asking them to adopt specific (charismatic) behaviors. One common charisma myth is that only extroverts are charismatic. In reality, research shows many charismatic introverts. In Western society, we place such emphasis on the skills and abilities of extroverts that introverts can end up feeling defective and uncool. But introversion can actually be an advantage for certain forms of charisma. Another myth is that charisma requires attractiveness. Yes, good looks do confer some advantage; but they’re not a necessary condition. In fact, charisma itself makes people more attractive. When instructed to exhibit specific charismatic behaviors in controlled experiments, participants’ levels of attractiveness were rated significantly higher than before. Switched

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Cabane: Low self-confidence, also



Photo credit:©Jason Stitt/123RF.com

Question: What are the most

Question: You suggest that charisma

One common charisma myth is that only extroverts are charismatic.

syndrome,” competent people feel they don’t really know what they’re doing, and are just waiting for the other shoe to drop, for someone to expose them as a fraud. This is a fairly common phenomenon, with more than 70 percent of the population experiencing it at one time or another. Interestingly, impostor syndrome is worst among high performers.  When I speak about it at Harvard, Yale, Stanford and MIT, I see the students breathe a sigh of relief as they realize this feeling has a name and they are not alone in experiencing it. Every year, the incoming class at Stanford Business School is asked: “How many of you in here feel that you are the one mistake that the admissions committee made?” Every year, two thirds of the class immediately raise their hand. It hits at all levels of business; you would be surprised at how high it goes. Many of the CEOs I coach have told me that they’ve been in a lifelong battle with the impostor syndrome. Switched

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consists of three core components: presence, power, and warmth. What are the defining characteristics of each?

Cabane: When people describe their

experience of seeing a charismatic person in action, whether Bill Clinton or the Dalai Lama, they often mention the individual’s extraordinary “presence.” Presence turns out to be a core component of charisma, the foundation upon which all else is built.

Such charismatic presence is rare because it takes effort to sustain. Have you ever felt, in the middle of a conversation, as if only half of your mind were present? When you’re not fully present in an interaction, there’s a good chance that your eyes will glaze over or that your facial reactions will be a split-second delayed. Since people can read facial expressions in as little as seventeen milliseconds, the person you’re speaking to will likely notice even the tiniest delays in your reactions. We may think that we can fake presence. But we’re wrong. When we’re not fully present in an interaction, people will see it. When you’re with a charismatic master−take Clinton, for example−you feel that he’s completely here with you, in this moment. Present. Charisma does not depend on how much time you have but on how fully present you are in each interaction. But if presence is the foundation on which charisma rests, power and warmth are the stuff of which it is built. �

Photo credit:©Blend Images/123RF.com

When we first meet someone, we instinctively assess whether that person is a potential friend or foe and whether they have the power to enact those intentions. To answer the first question, we try to assess how much he or she likes us. To answer the second question, we try to assess how much power he or she has. When you meet a charismatic person, you get the impression that they have a lot of power and they like you a lot. “Fight or flight?” is the power question. “Friend or foe?” is the warmth question. Power is seen as the ability to affect the world around us, whether through influence over others, financial, intellectual, social or physical means. We look for clues of power in a person’s appearance and body language, and in the way others react to them. Switched

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Warmth, simply put, is goodwill toward others. Warmth tells us whether or not people would want to use whatever power they have in our favor. Warmth is evaluated more directly than power, almost entirely through the person’s body language and behavior. Throughout our interactions, we instinctively look for clues with which to evaluate warmth or power, and then we adjust our assumptions accordingly. Expensive clothing leads us to assume wealth, friendly body language leads us to assume good intentions, a confident posture leads us to assume the person has something to be confident about. In essence, people will tend to accept whatever you project.

Question: What are the primary

charisma styles?



Cabane: The four primary kinds

welcomed, cherished, embraced, and, most of all, completely accepted. This is what the Dalai Lama is famous for.

Focus charisma is primarily based on a perception of presence. It gives people the feeling that you are fully present with them, listening to them and absorbing what they say. Focus charisma makes people feel heard, listened to, and understood. Don’t underestimate this kind of charisma; it can be surprisingly powerful. Elon Musk, founder of PayPal, is a perfect example.

Authority charisma is primarily based on a perception of power: the belief that this person has the power to affect our world. This form of charisma is possibly the most powerful one of all. Our instinctive deference to authority can take epic proportions, and, of course, can be equally turned toward good or evil. Colin Powell embodies authority charisma, but so did Stalin. The human reaction to authority runs deep; it’s hardwired into our brains.

Visionary charisma makes others feel inspired; it makes us believe. It can be remarkably effective even though it won’t necessarily make people like you. Steve Jobs was notoriously feared inside Apple and had many detractors both within and without, but even these detractors readily admitted to his being both visionary and charismatic. Kindness charisma is primarily based on warmth. It connects with people’s hearts, and makes them feel

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Question: Please evaluate the late

Steve Jobs in terms of his charisma when making major presentations such as the introduction of an iProduct.

Cabane: When Steve Jobs first

presents the Macintosh in 1984, his ownership of the stage is almost nonexistent: he spends most of his time hiding behind the lectern. Worse yet, in the one moment where he leaves the lectern to cross the stage, he actually goes into complete �

Photo credit:©Wavebreak Media Ltd/123RF.com

of charisma in business are: focus, visionary, kindness, and authority.

darkness, and the audience is left with nothing but an empty lectern to stare at. Although this is only a few seconds, it’s a few seconds too much.

punctuating his sentences, and using far too many words; and highly technical language− the presentation would be incomprehensible to non-experts.

The Steve Jobs of 2000, announcing his At that point, his speech tempo is poor; there’s frequent ‘dead time’ (unintended return as CEO of Apple and introducing pauses) in his speech. He’s reading from the Apple G4 at the MacWorld convention is a different animal his notes, and has zero engagement altogether. His ownership of the stage with the audience. His body language has skyrocketed− he’s a showman now. is low-confidence, displaying hunched He owns the stage. shoulders; often looking down; frequently seems His body language is to be looking at his much more fluid, shoes. He seems and overall, highly bashful, awkward, confident−he shy. What gestures looks down at his he does have are In essence, people will shoes only once, useless, wasting tend to accept whatever seemingly from the audience’s you project. emotion. His eye attention. contact is now outstanding. Hand By 1996, he’s gestures are few, walking around and are now used as the stage rather emphasis rather than than staying behind substitution. the podium, clearly more comfortable and confident. He’s His verbal language is much more speaking more fluidly, looking at concise. The “one more thing” is now the audience, taking questions and a inside joke; some people think it’s answering as he goes along. His body his creation. In fact, he got that from language is definitely more confident: old TV show Columbo. The great he looks straight ahead, takes up charismatic masters aren’t afraid to more space. However, overall, he still copy, imitate, and outright steal seems nerdy and nervous. Seems awkward, stiff, like the Tin Man His speech is carefully orchestrated, character in the Wizard of Oz movie. he uses theatrical techniques throughout his presentation. In fact, One sign is the amount of useless he’s using the same techniques as gestures he still makes: using his hands professional magicians to direct the to compensate for his uncertainty of audience attention. For instance, five being able to make his points with minutes into the G4 presentation, the enough emphasis. This is also reflected image is striking: just like a magician � in his language, with ‘umms’ and ‘ahs’ Switched

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in a black cape, with a black hat, pulling out a white rabbit, here’s Steve in his black top, against a black background, with a black pouch, pulling out a white G4 cube.

You can see him pulling magicians’ tricks again in 2007. That’s now his hallmark. He knows he’s in the entertainment business; his presentations are 100% entertainment. His personal brand is now clear in his clothing; and he never varies. People now expect it and love it. His body language is now so understated, casual, comfortable. In some cases, seems debonair, almost cavalier. Now has not just confidence, but comfort. He could be speaking from his living room. It’s an intimate �

Photo credit:©Illia Uriadnikov /123RF.com

Theatrics and magicians’ tricks will become a hallmark of his; you can see them again in his 2005 presentation introducing the iPod Nano: revealing the small white Nano that had been hidden in his pocket throughout the presentation, to the oohs and aahs of the audience. Just like in movies, he is now using close-ups to direct audience’s attention to where he wants it to go. By then, he’s finally getting comfortable with silence− and few

umms and ahs punctuate the pauses between his sentences.

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dialogue with the audience (see fireside chats) His confidence shows not just in his body language, but in his deliberate, dramatic use of silence: he’s comfortable making the audience wait for his next words. In fact, he plays with the audience; he teases the audience. Uses both joking at the expense of competitors; and joking at the expense of the audience.

Presence turns out to be a core component of charisma, the foundation upon which all else is built.

Simultaneously with increasing teasing and humour, he’s increased in warmth. Which indeed, makes sense. You have to increase warmth so the teasing doesn’t alienate them. And because he’s increased the power / confidence, he needs the warmth to compensate / balance. It comes across in his voice−far more fluctuation, a warmer tone−and his words: “we made a beautiful thing for your hand.” Instead of just ‘we made a beautiful thing,” he’s saying he made this beautiful thing for you. His language is now far from technical; his words are rich and caressing: ‘beautiful,’ ‘gorgeous’ or ‘love’−he never would’ve used those in 1984. By 2011, he’s moved beyond. He expresses humanity and vulnerability. He expresses awe and wonder, not just pride. He makes fun of himself, and of Apple. He actually talks about his products’ defects (and jokes about them). Never would’ve done that before. But he’s lost energy. He’s relying more on the data; less on his own presence and ‘wow’ effect. Even brings other people up on stage. One could �

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say he’s past his peak, as far as pure stage charisma goes.

First, breathe. You can’t be imposing without oxygen.

Question: Someone has read (and

One of the first things I question my clients when we work on projecting charismatic body language is: “What’s your breathing like right now?” Anytime your breathing is shallow, you activate the stress response. It’s hard to feel calm, relaxed, and confident when you’re not getting enough oxygen and your body thinks it’s in fight- or-flight �

then, preferably re-read) your book with great care, highlighting key passages, and is determined to increase her or his personal magnetism. Where to begin?

Cabane: The fastest ways to increase

Photo credit:©Dmitriy Shironosov/123RF.com

charisma: get alpha gorilla body language.

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mode. Make sure you can breathe, so avoid constrictive clothing. Taking even just one deep, slow, full breath can instantly lower your stress level, increase your feeling of confidence well-being, and even boost your immune system. So give it a try: inhale slowly for five counts, hold for two, and exhale for five again. Second, stand up and shake up your body. You could jiggle your arms and legs, maybe even bounce up and down. Now take a wide stance and plant your feet firmly on the ground. A wide, stable stance helps you both feel and project more confidence. And this, ladies, requires shoes that are stable. Your brain’s first job is to monitor your safety, whether it’s your ability to escape predators or your ability to stay upright. If it has to spend any of its attention worrying about your breathing or your

Olivia Fox Cabane Olivia Fox Cabane has lectured at Stanford, Yale, Harvard, MIT, the Marine Corps War College and the United Nations. As keynote speaker and executive coach to the leadership of Fortune 500 companies, she helps people become more persuasive, influential, and inspiring. From a base of thorough behavioral science,

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balance, that means that at least one part of your attention can’t be devoted to your speaking success. Why waste any of your focus? Now imagine being a big gorilla: inflate as if you were trying to double in size. Assuming a strong, confident physical posture will make you feel more confident and more powerful. People who assume expansive poses experience a measurable physiological shift. In one experiment, assertivenessand energy- promoting hormones rose by 19 percent, while anxiety hormones fell by 25 percent. As confidence rises, your body language adapts accordingly. This gives you yet another biochemical boost, and the cycle builds upon itself. Keep practicing, and confident body language will become second nature. ■

Olivia extracts the most practical tools for business, applying the latest in global behavioral science to everyday leadership needs to improve her clients’ productivity, effectiveness and efficiency. Her first book, The Charisma Myth, published by Penguin/ Random House, went into second printing before it even launched. Her upcoming book on the mental side of innovation is representative of her ability to take the complexities of psychological factors and transform them into immediately applicable leadership tools for individuals.

Photo credit:©rawpixel/123RF.com

How People Analytics Is Redefining The Way We Work, Live, And Hire

By Suzanna Colberg

T

he need for people analytics within a human resources function is a discussion that has been on the table for the past several years. Extensive digital and cultural changes in the modern workplace have begun Switched

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to reshape and redefine both the structure of organizations as well as the culture of the workplace and, in many cases, the work itself. Now more than ever, organizations are relying more heavily on data to find, hire, and manage talent. �

HR, People Analytics, And The Modern Workplace

implementing and developing “people analytics” within their business models.

In his Bloomberg Business article, author and Humanyze CEO Ben Waber points out that even the slightest changes in behavior -- and in workplace procedures and conditions − allow workers to be happier, healthier, and perform better. Waber writes, “People analytics transforms our understanding of socialization in the workplace, the impact of office layout, and even concepts as ‘soft’ as creativity.” Analytics, he says, have the potential to radically improve the way we work.

The Deloitte University Press’s recent publication, Global Human Capital Trends 2016, discusses these changes and the increasing importance of people data among organizations, highlighting:

●● 82% of HR respondents view analytics as very important or important ●● 69% of business people view analytics as important �

Photo credit:©Dmitriy Shironosov/123RF.com

Indeed, an increasing number of organizations are putting an emphasis on

●● 77% of all organizations believe people analytics is important

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HR Metrics And Analytics Use And Impact

Analytics in human capital management is being used in a number of different areas in businesses to drive positive momentum.

HR teams not only seem to be accepting but embracing the integration of HR data and people analytics into the internal processes of the business, and with good reason. In situations that require high-volume hiring for lower-skilled work, the use of datadriven hiring assessments to cull the applicant pool improves job tenure by 15 percent. There’s no arguing automated systems and the data they produce can sort and clarify information that might otherwise overwhelm even the most efficient and effective HR and recruiting departments. The data provided by tools like hiring assessments  in conjunction with cloud-based HR systems - which provide a more comprehensive overview of integrated HR data - can help HR staff and hiring managers make workforce-based decisions with a higher degree of accuracy than ever before. Switched

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In their HR industry research in Global Human Capital Trends 2016, authors Michael Stephan, Shinichiro Uzawa, Erica Volini, Brett Walsh, and Roberta Yoshida articulate that the vision for the future of HR is not one that involves HR departments being nudged out of relevancy by data and technology. On the contrary, “This year, HR teams are more focused on innovation, analytics, and the rapid adoption of cloud and mobile technologies to make the work experience better.” Analytics in human capital management is being used in a number of different areas in businesses to drive positive momentum. From utilizing prehire assessments that expedite the hiring process to identifying potential leadership candidates, data play an increasingly vital role in driving desirable outcomes across the board. The Deloitte study gives several examples of how people analytics specifically is driving organizations into the future by applying advanced analytics to HR management decisions. On a broad scale, people analytics is helping identify better-fitting candidates, predict peaks and troughs in workflows, and contribute to building stronger company cultures. Identifying The High Performers: With the help of analytics, the profiles of top performers in an organization can be analyzed as a means to �

help identify candidates with similar strengths and core competencies, and who show the most promise of performing well and staying engaged and within companies for a longer period of time. Avoiding The Low Performers: Analytics has been used in certain cases to predict which candidates are at risk of becoming toxic employees, and has successfully aided in reducing the number of workers who meet these criteria in specific organizations. Determining Factors That Contribute To Maximum Employee Productivity: One organization has begun to experiment with using smart badges and has gathered data that suggest offices with more natural light and intercompany collaboration experience higher rates of productivity and lower rates of employee attrition and turnover.

allow decision-makers to take greater responsibility for issues such as turnover, attrition, and retention of the highestperforming employees. Though organizations are still in the early stages of adopting and implementing technology that allows them to leverage data in new ways among their workforces, it is clear these trends are gaining momentum. Some organizations have even begun to add roles like “leadership development specialist” and “chief experience officer” to improve customer experience both among external customers as well as internal stakeholders. For efficient and effective HR staff and business partners, HR metrics and analytics are becoming increasingly essential, and will soon be necessary in optimizing business outcomes. Indeed, these data present unprecedented insights and opportunities for managers and leadership across all business aspects. ■

Strategizing For Peaks And Troughs In Work Schedules: Some automotive companies have begun to study patterns of attendance, observing when unplanned absences peak throughout the year. The data gathered from these patterns enable these companies to schedule more workers for shifts known to have high absence rates. Increasing Employee Engagement: A major credit card company has begun assessing patterns and relationships among people data to Switched

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Suzanna Colberg Suzanna Colberg is the Content Marketing Manager for FurstPerson, a market leader in data-driven, pre-hire talent assessment solutions for frontline service, support, and sales jobs.

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ThInk CrITICally i InflUEnCE ProfoUndly i InnovaTE lIkE an EnTrEPrEnEUr

ISSUE 9 Think CriTiCally i influenCe Profoundly i innovaTe like an enTrePreneur

ThInk CrITICally i InflUEnCE ProfoUndly i InnovaTE lIkE an EnTrEPrEnEUr

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iSSue 6

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Think CriTiCally i influenCe Profoundly i innovaTe like an enTrePreneur

Carol Kinsey Goman:

Persuasion

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12

DaniEl pink:

How To Hire Top

performers



ISSUE 15

Guy KawasaKi

Dr BraDforD smarT:

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ThInk CrITICally i InflUEnCE ProfoUndly i InnovaTE lIkE an EnTrEPrEnEUr

Driving EmployEE LeSSonS I Learnt From EngagEmEnt Steve JobS

Billionaire

Language Tips

How SucceSSfuL

suCCess

Business

AriAnnA Huffington:

The Third MeTric

To redefining

SucceSS

Dr. John Demartini

Jack Ma:

To Be

For Career

In LIfe and

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Leaders Should Create Meaningful Why

Environments

Henrik Bresman,

INSEAD Associate Professor of Organisational Behaviour Switched

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O

rganisations that empower and give meaning to their members are not only more dignified but also more innovative.

Photo credit:©Wavebreak Media Ltd/123RF.com

Early in its history, Southwest Airlines was up against major carriers undercutting it on price and the company knew it had to take some radical steps. After selling one of its four planes just to make payroll, the leadership then asked how it could continue to transport the same number of passengers with fewer planes. The CEO knew he didn’t have all the solutions, so the whole company was put to work. Ideas were sourced from baggage handlers, ground crew, flight crew and even pilots. Based on all of their knowledge of what it takes to turn a plane around at airports, they invented a new way of organising themselves and cut airport

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turnaround time from 45-60 minutes down to 10. Southwest Airlines continues to involve employees in problem solving and innovation, letting them make decisions on the ground to make sure that customers have a positive experience and operations run smoothly. There is a lot of contact across levels of the firm and rewards and recognition for people who make a difference. The leaders at the top create conditions that enable others in the organisation to take charge. Top management establishes the core values, like customer service and integrity, and then lets employees figure out how best to bring those values to life. Southwest treats its employees with dignity and they in turn treat their customers with respect, making it famous for service. �

To be consistently successful, leadership tasks need to be distributed across levels, across functions, across geographies and across individuals to wherever the best information and capabilities reside.

Not only has this made Southwest an attractive career destination, it has also brought it decades of strong profits. The company filed its first $1 billion in annual profit for 2014. Put simply, Southwest’s success can be put down to what I and my colleague Deborah Ancona call distributed leadership. Don’t Be A Hero Unfortunately, there aren’t many Southwests out there. But if companies can create meaningful, dignified work environments, they can also create highly innovative and adaptable organisations. And they can do it by distributing leadership. What we often refer to as leadership is the notion of a heroic leader Switched

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performing miracles from the very top of an organisation. While this can be reassuring, especially at times of uncertainty, this type of leadership cannot be consistently successful in a changing environment - the kind of environment in which just about any organisation and any leader we know now operates in. To be consistently successful, leadership tasks need to be distributed across levels, across functions, across geographies and across individuals to wherever the best information and capabilities reside. But this raises two questions: What capabilities are needed for effective leadership? And how can these capabilities be mobilised to put distributed leadership into action? The Capabilities You Need Our research has identified four such core capabilities for distributed leadership, which we call the “4-CAP model”. The first is “sense-making”, which involves making sense of the context in which the organisation is operating. This should include dialogue and frequent communication up and down the organisation, as well as communication to outside stakeholders to source expertise and new ideas. Connecting and mapping customer demands, cultural norms and competitive challenges is essential to understanding the environment. Second, is “relating”. Leadership is not a solo sport. We lead through many people, so the ability to create trusting relationships with people �

different from ourselves is part of the relating capability. At the core of relating are two essential behaviours: inquiry and advocacy. To trust and empower the corporate entrepreneurs and mavericks at the front lines, let go of your own perspective and put yourself in their shoes. But inquiry alone is not leadership, so advocacy is inquiry in reverse, letting the other person know what your reasoning, data and understanding is to open the way for dialogue. Third, “visioning” is about creating a compelling picture of the future. While sense-making is about “what is”, “visioning” is about “what is possible”. It Switched

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is a process of articulating what members of an organisation may be able to create in the future. Steve Jobs was good at explaining that Apple was not just in the business of building computers, but in building a machine that will change the way people think, act, learn and live. Lastly, “inventing” involves developing creative ways to get around roadblocks and keeping the organisation moving as it shifts in new directions. This means creating the structures and processes to move toward the vision outlined in the previous point. It’s important to give people permission to break the rules but at the same time provide them with guardrails. �

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Leaders need others to be complete, which is why they need to rely on teams.

Together We Can Be Heroes But how many of us have all four capabilities and, more importantly, how many leaders do we know that have all four? Our research suggests that most people are good at one and in exceptional cases, two. Ancona makes the point in this article that it’s time to end the myth of the complete leader, the flawless person at the top who’s got it all figured out. Leaders need others to be complete, which is why they need to rely on teams. These capabilities tend to be distributed across leaders in the organisation. We introduce this model team in our book, X-Teams. X-teams are the vehicle by which distributed leadership takes place as they enable employees to make connections throughout the organisation and its power structure as well as outside the organisation, hence the “X”, which stands for external action. Throughout our research, we’ve found that high performance teams in today’s organisations “go out” before they “go in”. ■

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Henrik Bresman Henrik Bresman is an Associate Professor of Organisational Behavior at INSEAD and the Academic Director of both the INSEAD Global Leadership Centre and The HEAD Foundation. He is also co-director of the Management Acceleration Programme, part of INSEAD’s suite of executive education offerings and the co-author of X-Teams: How to Build Teams that Lead, Innovate and Succeed. You can follow him on Twitter at @HenrikBresman. This article is republished courtesy of INSEAD Knowledge http://knowledge.insead.edu Copyright INSEAD 2016

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Compassion in Leadership

By Jim Bouchard

“Wisdom, compassion, and courage are the three universally recognized moral qualities of men.” ~ Confucius

I

did not know this quotation when I started looking for the most essential qualities of an effective leader. In fact, I arrived at the same three qualities by asking a group of kids what they were looking for in a leader. For about 3 years I asked the Junior Instructors in my martial arts program what words would best describe a leader; someone they would follow willingly. Switched

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They came up with the same three words Confucius shared long, long ago. Compassion was the most complicated... Is Compassion simply treating others as you would have them treat you? Is it being “nice?” Well- sometimes as a leader, you’ve got to be cruel to be kind. Compassion goes much deeper than just being kind. �

Compassion means developing a mindful connection with the feelings, needs and desires of others.

No- rather than kindness, the defining characteristic of authentic Compassion is...

For a leader, Compassion means developing a meaningful and authentic connection with the needs, desires and motivations of your followers.

...Respect.

It does sometimes mean kindness. At other times it means doing what is right and best even when it means you’ve got to be tough, direct, honest and sometimes even cruel.

Respect means caring for others. Compassion means to express caring, respectfully, with the best interests of others in your heart and in your mindeven when it’s tough! Can you see how Compassion and Courage go hand in hand? You really can’t have authentic Compassion without Courage- and Courage unchecked by Compassion becomes arrogance.

An executive may have to approve the lay-off of 50 loyal employees to save the company and the jobs of 500 others. A manager may have to give a brutally honest performance review that hurts an employee’s feelings.

“Regard your soldiers as your children, and they will follow you into the deepest valleys; look on them as your own beloved sons, and they will stand by you even unto death.” ~ Sun Tzu � Photo credit:©chrupka/123RF.com

The general may order 100 troops into a hopeless battle to cover the retreat of 10,000 others. Is that decision cruel- or compassionate?

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Internet connection required

I now know that it is the perfect resume. Leaders are made, not born. I’ll go a little further, leaders are transformed.

Jim Bouchard The most important investment you make in the success of your organization is an investment in the cultivation and development of “character disciplined leaders”. “Leadership that ranks high on the ROC Character Assessment Scale achieves nearly 5 times the return on assets that leaders who fall at the bottom of the curve achieve.” ~ from Return On Character by Fred Kiel. THE SENSEI LEADER will help you produce these results...and MORE! I’m a former drug addict and two time college dropout. I used to think that was a miserable resume for someone who trains leaders to be better people. Switched

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Leaders are people who transform themselves through their experiences, opportunities and challenges to become the people others count on for inspiration, guidance and action. I transformed myself from a loser to a leader−from a drug abuser to a Black Belt, and later to Sensei. Over 25 years of teaching I helped hundreds of others transform themselves into Black Belts, and thousands more discover their best selves. Jim Bouchard’s  keynotes, workshops and seminars help you build and maintain a strong culture of "character disciplined leadership," the foundation of organizational success. He is an internationally recognized business speaker, trainer and author of THE SENSEI LEADER and THINK Like a BLACK BELT.

Sharpen your communication skills and make an impact with this one tip.

Internet connection required

Christele Canard

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Christele Canard, the Founder of Switched On Leadership, is a dynamic business professional with a broad marketing and business consulting background. Interested in helping others create success, both at an individual and organisational level, Christele focuses on the implementation of proven business strategies combined with a transformational winning psychology.

Did You Know… Did You Know… Did You Know…

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5% of customer service cases will be initiated by Internet-connected devices, up from 0.02%

Source: Gartner – Predicts 2015

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Tell me what YOU want!

I want to hear from you! How can we make Switched On Leadership even better? What topics would you like covered? Which articles have you liked the most so far? What would you like to see more of? Shoot me an email…and tell me what you think. I’ll be reading each and every response.

Christele

Christele Canard Founder, Switched On Leadership

Contact Christele

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• Mental Toughness And The Relentless Pursuit Of Greatness Mental toughness

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and the Relentless Pursuit of greatness

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Dr Jason selk

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• Pitch To Win: It’s What You’re Not Doing That Makes All The Difference

Hamish McKenzie

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Hamish McKenzie

Pitch to Win: it’s What You’re

that not Doing Makes All

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• Killing LY Adverbs With 3 Key Steps • 5 Essential Lists to Make Before the End of This Year Jocko Willink and Leif BaBin

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How U.S. Navy SEaLS

iSSue 25

LEad aNd wiN

Jocko Willink and Leif BaBin

How U.S. Navy SEaLS

LEad aNd wiN

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• Disrupt Or Be Disrupted: How To Thrive in the Era of Endless Innovation

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• Five Magnificent Ways You Can Lead Like Google Without Spending A Dime On Perks Jay Samit n Switched

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Be DisrupteD: How To Thrive In The Era

Of Endless Innovation Jay Samit

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Dr ADAm FraSer Switched

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CharaCteristiCs of high Performers



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Dr ADAm FraSer

CharaCteristiCs of high Performers

• • • • • •

Humble Narcissists Make Great Leaders Leading In Times Of Adversity Characteristics Of High Performers Eight Ways To Begin A Speech Leading People You Don’t Like Creating Corporate Energy – How To Engage And Inspire Others • The Rise Of The Social Media Thought Leader: How Expertise Creates Influence • Leadership Hacks • Did You Know?

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Science of PoSitive

Michelle Gielann Switched

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change:

How Small Shifts Can Create Big Ripple Effects

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Jack Delosa

From University

DropoUt

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to selF-maDe

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From University

DropoUt

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Millionaire

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iSSue 19

BoB Burg

How

To win PeoPle over

Without

Manipulation

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BoB Burg

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A m y Morin

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Amy Morin

Mental

Strength

• • • • •

How To Coach The Strong Personality: Three Secrets Take A Risk: The Odds Are Better Than You Think Mental Strength Mastering The Skill You Lack To Get The Promotion You Deserve Intuitive Intelligence In Leadership Five Communication Traits That Turn People Off Why It Can Be Good To Feel Like An Imposter At Work Leadership Hacks Did You Know? The Performance Benefits of Social Selling

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• Thought Leadership • Five Tips for Making Better Decisions Cheryl Snapp Conner

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Thought Leadership Cheryl Snapp Conner

Thought Leadership

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PeTer Bregman The Power of

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PeTer Bregman The Power of

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SecondS

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Seven 10X Rules For Success How to Think Like Bill Gates The Power of Four Seconds Are You Making Any Of These Common Feedback Mistakes? Warning: Bad Meetings Will Get You Fired How Google Picks New Employees (Hint: It’s Not About Your Degree) First Know Thyself, Then Your Team Leadership Hacks Did You Know? Job Satisfaction

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• Do You Self-Sabotage? Consider These 10 Loopholes

Dr. John Demartini

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Dr. John Demartini

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StrategieS Fail Mark Chussil:

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To redefining

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SucceSS

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LeSSonS I Learnt From

Steve JobS

Guy KawasaKi

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LeSSonS I Learnt From

Steve JobS

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• Billionaire Jack Ma Teaches You To Be Successful In Life And Business Billionaire

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• Eliciting The Truth: Team Culture Surveys



• Creative Leadership: Humility And Being Wrong

Think CriTiCally i influenCe Profoundly i innovaTe like an enTrePreneur

iSSue 4

• The Psychology Of Getting More Done (In Less Time)

The Psychology of

geTTing

• Mentally Strong People: The 13 Things They Avoid

More Done

(in less TiMe)

Dr rOberT cialDini:

The Science Of PerSuaSiOn

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Think CriTiCally i influenCe Profoundly i innovaTe like an enTrePreneur

iSSue 4

• 9 Unseen Qualities That Create Exceptional Leaders

The Psychology of

• The Science Of Persuasion

geTTing

More Done

(in less TiMe)

• Did You Know? Find out how many of your employees might be getting ready to leave

Dr rOberT cialDini:

The Science Of PerSuaSiOn

• 10 Reasons Your Top Talent Will Leave You

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• The 10 Best Interview Questions That Find Great Talent



• 4 Words That Double Persuasion

Think CriTiCally i influenCe Profoundly i innovaTe like an enTrePreneur

iSSue 3

• How Great Leaders Communicate

4double ThaT Words

Persuasion

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DaniEl pink:

Driving EmployEE EngagEmEnt

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Think CriTiCally i influenCe Profoundly i innovaTe like an enTrePreneur

iSSue 3

4double ThaT Words

Persuasion

DaniEl pink:

Driving EmployEE EngagEmEnt

• Did You Know? The alarming statistics regarding employee engagement • Driving Employee Engagement • Meditate For More Profitable Decisions • Strategic Leadership As A Competitive Advantage • Feedforward Coaching Instead Of Annual Reviews • Four Areas Where Senior Leaders Should Focus Their Attention

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• A Brilliant Method To Generate Ideas For Your Business



• 5 Non-Tech CEOs Using Social Media To Drive Business Results

THINK CRITICALLY I INFLUENCE PROFOUNDLY I INNOVATE LIKE AN ENTREPRENEUR

ISSUE 2

5

• The Positive Power Of Negative Thinking

NON-TECH CEOS USING SOCIAL MEDIA TO DRIVE BUSINESS RESULTS

• Today’s CTO: The Chief Transformation Officer Switched

TODAY’S CTO: THE CHIEF TRANSFORMATION OFFICER

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THINK CRITICALLY I INFLUENCE PROFOUNDLY I INNOVATE LIKE AN ENTREPRENEUR

• How To Start A Speech

ISSUE 2

• 5 Reasons Tenure Kills Culture

5

NON-TECH CEOS USING SOCIAL MEDIA TO DRIVE BUSINESS RESULTS

• The 7 Disciplines Of A Successful Leader

TODAY’S CTO: THE CHIEF TRANSFORMATION OFFICER

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• Innovation: Think Big, Start Small, Scale Fast!

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• Big Data: The Mega-Trend That Will Impact All Our Lives

THINK CRITICALLY I INFLUENCE PROFOUNDLY I INNOVATE LIKE AN ENTREPRENEUR

ISSUE 1

• Art Of Managing - The Tough Questions That Great Managers Constantly Ask Themselves

THE MEGA-TREND THAT WILL IMPACT ALL OUR LIVES

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INSIDE

THE BRAIN OF AN ENTREPRENEUR

• Inside The Brain Of An Entrepreneur

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THINK CRITICALLY I INFLUENCE PROFOUNDLY I INNOVATE LIKE AN ENTREPRENEUR

ISSUE 1

THE MEGA-TREND THAT WILL IMPACT ALL OUR LIVES

• Building An Inspiring Business: The Power Of Mission Statements

INSIDE

THE BRAIN OF AN ENTREPRENEUR

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Advertising: For advertising inquires click here. Write for us: If you are interested in submitting an article for Switched On Leadership magazine, we’d love to hear from you! Send us an email. Got something interesting to share? We are always looking for ground breaking companies to feature and awesome leaders to interview. Send us an email. Subscriptions: Switched On Leadership is a monthly magazine. To subscribe click here.

General Information Only: We intend for the information in our publications to only serve as a general overview on matters of interest. The information in our publications is not intended to be comprehensive, nor does it constitute advice in any way. We attempt to ensure that the content is current and accurate but we do not guarantee its currency and accuracy. You should carry out your own research and/or seek your own advice before acting or relying on any of the information in our publications. © Christele Canard 2016

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