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REGENTS FIELD served as Michigan's first permanent home field. Originally accommodating ..... fans filled the stadium, breaking both the Michigan Stadium and NCAA single-game ..... Most Home Ties, Season: 2 (1963, 1975). Undefeated ...

MICHIGAN STADIUM

REGENTS FIELD served as Michigan’s first permanent home field. Originally accommodating just 400 fans, temporary bleachers were erected to seat up to 17,000. The Wolverines compiled an 87-2-3 record at Regents Field.

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

FOOTBALL FIELD HISTORY

1883 / First home game played on May 12. 1890 / The Regents of the University of Michigan authorize $3,000 for the purchase of 10 acres of land for a football field.

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1891 / The Regents approve $5,000 to “put the field in shape.” 1893 / “The Athletic Field,” later known as Regents Field, opens with a capacity of 400. October 7 / Michigan defeats the Detroit Athletic Club, 6-0, in the opening game at Regents Field. 1895 / The original stands at Regents Field burn down. 1896 / The Regents order the construction of another covered stand in order to offer seating to 800 people. 1902 / Due to the donation of 21 acres by Detroit native Dexter Ferry, the Regents change the name of the complex to Ferry Field. 1906 / The home field of the Wolverines moves to a new site on the land that Dexter Ferry donated the year before. The new field Ferry Field - is located where the outdoor track now stands. 1914 / Concrete stands are erected at Ferry Field, increasing capacity to 25,000. 1921 / The stands around Ferry Field are completed, increasing capacity to 40,000. 1925 / The land where Michigan Stadium now stands is purchased for $240,000. This land is located where a spring had been, a source that had served the University of Michigan’s water needs in its earlier days. 1926 / The Athletic Association increases the capacity of Ferry Field by adding wooden structures to both ends. The Board of Athletics offers bonds at a price of $500 each to pay for the construction of Michigan Stadium. The bond-holder was offered the

The first University of Michigan football game played on a home field occurred on May 12, 1883, when Michigan took on the Detroit Industrial Team in Ann Arbor. For the next 10 years, Michigan players would call two sites in Ann Arbor, as well as several fields in Detroit, home turf. The Wolverines fared well in Detroit, recording a 12-4-1 mark in games played there, but had an even better record in Ann Arbor, going 18-1 at the locations where Waterman Gym was later built and where Burns Park stands today. Following a successful Michigan football season in 1890, the Michigan Board of Regents authorized $3,000 for the purchase of land so a permanent home football field for the Wolverines could be built. Twelve months later, the Regents voted to add $5,000 more to this allotment to improve drainage and put the field into shape. By the fall of 1893, this new facility was ready, and on Oct. 7th, Michigan played on a permanent home field site for the first time, defeating the Detroit Athletic Club, 6-0. The new home of Michigan Football, named Regents Field, was located along South State Street, where Schembechler Hall stands today. Though Regents Field had a single wooden bleacher section that seated 400 people, many more would show up for the Michigan home games. The original seating area burned down in 1895. The following year, the Regents ordered construction of another covered stand. This stand doubled the seating capacity to 800 but still fell far short of demand. Often times, temporary seats were erected to accommo-

date the throngs of Wolverine faithful. Crowds of 5,000 were not uncommon in the early part of the 20th Century. In 1902, Detroit native Dexter M. Ferry donated 21 acres of land to the University, stretching from South State Street to the railroad tracks. This donation united the land which now comprises the athletics campus of the University of Michigan. In honor of this gift, the University Regents renamed the entire complex as Ferry Field. Despite the name change, the stadium still only had room One fact that remains unknown about Michigan Stadium is the location of Fritz Crisler’s seat - the single seat indicated at the end of the stadium’s capacity. Despite this anonymity, the legacies of Crisler and Yost live on as Michigan continues to pack the stadium full of 100,000plus fans, game after game. for a small number of fans. As Fielding Yost’s “Point-A-Minute” teams continued to win games, Ann Arborites, Michiganders and people from around the nation came to see the “Champions of the West.” Realizing the need to accommodate more people, the Regents approved the building of a new football field. The new complex was to continue under the name Ferry Field and would be located closer to campus at the site where the Michigan outdoor track now lies. But while the name stayed the same, much else about the new field was different. Unlike the old field, which was home to the football, baseball and track teams, the

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grass on Ferry Field was for football use only. Michigan had built separate practice fields so that use of Ferry Field could be restricted to game days only. In addition, Ferry Field had the capacity to seat 18,000 fans. To facilitate media coverage, Ferry Field included a press box on the Hoover Street side, where the Intramural Sports Building now stands. After compiling a record of 87-2-3 at Regents Field, many wondered whether the new field could offer such great success. Michigan quickly answered that question in its new setting. On Oct. 6, 1906, Johnny Garrels scored the first touchdown en route to a 28-0 victory over Case. As Michigan continued to win at home and fans lined up to pay $1 to see a Michigan home football game (conference rules required that students pay no more than 50 cents), Fielding Yost saw the need to increase the seating capacity of Ferry Field. In 1921, Yost’s wish was granted as temporary wooden bleachers were added to both ends of the stadium to almost double capacity from 21,000 to 40,000. This substantial increase in stadium capacity was not enough and Yost soon asked the Regents for approval to build a new stadium. The “Roaring ‘20s” were a great time for stadium building. In the previous five years, Michigan had already played in the dedication game of the home stadiums for Vanderbilt, Ohio State, Michigan State and Illinois. In addition, conference foes Minnesota, Northwestern and Purdue had each erected new facilities. Fielding H. Yost envisioned a stadium that would seat between

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100,000 and 150,000 people for each Michigan home game. Because of the recent expansion of Ferry Field, the Regents were reticent to approve Yost’s request. Once word of Yost’s idea reached the public, the debate raged in the Ann Arbor community. Some contended a new stadium with twice the capacity would create no serious evils and would provide greater convenience to the students, alumni and general public. However, others believed the new stadium would injure the University academically, socially and intellectually. Furthermore, it was stated that the large stadium would inevitably increase student attention to football in conversation, publications and in attendance at practice. The increased interest would become a detriment to the community as it would overshadow academic and scholastic honors. The building of a new stadium would be a permanent and undeniable concession - set in concrete for years to come - to the notion that “college is nothing more than a Roman holiday.” Through Yost’s dogged perseverance, the Regents approved

the new stadium on April 22, 1926. Although Yost originally wanted to build the new stadium where the Michigan Golf Course is now located, that plan was denied. Instead, this new structure was to be built on land the University had purchased in 1925, land that at one time had been home to a barn, a strawberry patch and an underground spring. This underground spring had been capable of delivering 300 gallons of water per minute, which had served the University’s water needs in the early years. The water posed a problem to the construction, as the land had to be lowered to take care of a large underground lake. The underground lake also led to a surface which nearly resembled quicksand. It was this moist ground that during construction, engulfed a crane which, according to legend, remains under the stadium today. The high water table also led to nearly three-quarters of the stadium being built below ground level. After much debate, the Regents, the University of Michigan and Fielding Yost reached an agreement by which the stadium would seat 72,000.

However, Yost was able to influence the plans so the stadium could be expanded to seat more than 100,000. The construction would be financed not by the taxpayers of the State of Michigan, but by the sale of 3,000 $500 bonds. These bonds would entitle the bondholder to buy season tickets (guaranteed to be between the 30-yard lines) for every season from 1927 until the bonds would be retired in 1936 (due to the Great Depression, not a penny was paid on these bonds between 1931 and 1936, and they were not completely retired until October 15, 1947). With Yost’s successful promotion, the bonds sold and construction began. Fashioned after the Yale Bowl, 440 tons of reinforcing steel and 31,000 square feet of wire mesh went into the building of the 44-section, 72-row, 72,000seat stadium at a cost of $950,000. The original seats consisted of 22 miles of California Redwood and the 360 x 160 foot grass playing field included the planting of one four leaf clover. Despite the grandeur of the new home, doubt still existed, as it was written in an article on the last game at Ferry Field, “Ferry Field passed on as the home of Michigan Football Saturday to give place to a larger, possibly better field…” Again the question of home field success arose, as Michigan had gone 88-14-2 in games played on Ferry Field. As the stadium neared completion, Yost requested an addition of 10,000 temporary seats for the concourse at the top of the sta-

right to purchase tickets from the 1927 through 1936 seasons, when the bonds were scheduled to be retired. The seats offered to these bondholders were guaranteed to be between the 30-yard lines. 1927 / Michigan Stadium is constructed at a cost of $950,000. It contains 70 rows and is designed to seat 72,000 fans. Capacity was increased to 84,401 with the addition of wooden bleachers. October 1 / The first game in Michigan Stadium is played. The Wolverines defeat Ohio Wesleyan, 33-0. October 22 / In the dedication game of Michigan Stadium, Michigan blanks Ohio State behind a thenrecord crowd of 84,401. 1928 Stadium capacity is increased to 85,753. 1930 / Michigan installs electronic scoreboards at both ends of the stadium, becoming the first stadium to use electronic scoreboards as official time. 1946 / Michigan breaks the half million mark in a season for the first time with 514,598 fans. 1949 / Permanent steel stands replace the wooden bleachers, raising capacity of Michigan Stadium to 97,239. 1949 / In the first year that NCAA attendance records are kept, Michigan leads the nation with an average of 93,894 for each of its six home games. Michigan’s nearest competitor, Ohio State, averages 76,429. 1956 / The capacity of Michigan Stadium is increased once again, and the “Big House” now holds 101,001 people.

As Fielding Yost’s “Point-A-Minute” teams gained fame and popularity, Michigan’s regents approved a new football complex on the corner of State and Hoover. FERRY FIELD, completed in 1906, could seat 18,000 fans and offered a press box to facilitate growing media coverage.

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A state-of-the-art press box is added at a cost of $700,000. Dedicated on Sept. 22, 1956, it includes a press area, photo deck and dark rooms. October 6 / Michigan Stadium hosts over 100,000 people for the first time, as 101,001 see Michigan and Michigan State square off. 1968 August / The scoreboards at each end of the stadium are replaced at a cost of $75,000. November 16 / Michigan crushes Wisconsin, 34-9, in the last Michigan Stadium game on grass for the next 22 seasons. 1969 June / Evidence that turf requires less maintenance than grass and could withstand any type of weather led the U-M Regents to approve installation of artificial turf. At a cost of $250,000, 88,285 feet of Tartan Turf is installed in July. September 20 / The Wolverines break-in the newly installed Tartan Turf with a 42-14 defeat over Vanderbilt. October 4 / The Wolverines lose at home to Missouri, 40-17. Michigan would not lose another game at home until Nov. 22, 1975, a streak of 41 games. 1972 / The University of Michigan leads the nation in attendance as 513,398 (85,566 average) fans watch Michigan go 6-0 at home. 1973 / Michigan Stadium capacity increases to 101,701. The box seats and railing are removed from the first few rows and replaced with bleachers. 1974 / Michigan leads the nation in attendance, as it has done every season since except 1997. 1975 The playing area is resurfaced with Tartan Turf. November 8 / 102,415 fans are on hand as Michigan shuts out Purdue, 28-0. This begins a streak of consecutive crowds over 100,000 at Michigan Stadium that is still alive today. 1976 / Stadium seats are repainted and workers discover 19 new seats, 15 where the old box seats and rails were eliminated and four new ones above the tunnel. The painting of the seats is part of a $250,000 face-lift of the stadium. 1982 / The playing area is resurfaced, this time with All-Pro Turf. November 17, 1990 / Michigan defeats Minnesota, 35-18, in its last Michigan Stadium game on artificial turf. From 1969, when the turf was installed, Michigan compiled a 119-18-3 record while playing on artificial turf in the stadium.

dium. This request was passed, and Michigan Stadium opened at the corner of Main Street and Stadium Boulevard with a capacity of 84,401 – the largest college owned stadium of any team in the nation. On Oct. 1, 1927, Michigan played Ohio Wesleyan in the first game at Michigan Stadium. The game was a success as Michigan started the scoring on a 28-yard pass from Louis Gilbert to tight end Kip Taylor, and prevailed easily, 33-0. Dedication of the new stadium came three weeks later, Oct. 22, 1927, against Ohio State. The Buckeyes came into Michigan Stadium seeking revenge for a game five years earlier, when the Wolverines spoiled the dedication of Ohio Stadium with a 19-0 victory. However, Michigan was not to be denied on its big day, and the Wolverines blanked the Buckeyes 21-0 before a capacity crowd of 84,401. Before the 1927 season ended, Michigan shattered its own attendance mark again, drawing 84,423 to a game against Minnesota. After a successful season in which the Wolverines drew nearly 300,000 fans, the capacity of Michigan Stadium was upped to 85,753 prior to the start of the 1928 season. In 1930, the University took advantage of new technology and installed electronic scoreboards at both ends of the stadium. In doing so, Michigan Stadium became the first to use electronic scoreboards for official game time. With the end of World War II in 1945, Michigan Stadium was dedicated to all the men and women who gave their lives for the United States. In their honor, a bronze eagle was placed at the southwest entrance of the stadium where it remains today. The Wolverines continued to draw crowds in the 80,000 range for 20 years, and in 1949, plans were drawn up to increase the size of the stadium. The most ambitious of the plans called for the addition of a top deck entirely around the stadium, increasing capacity to 125,300. Permanent steel stands around the stadium complex were finally settled upon, allowing for seating of 97,239 fans. Michigan also replaced the temporary wooden bleachers erected in 1927 with permanent steel ones. In its first game in the enlarged stadium, Michigan drew a thenrecord capacity crowd to the game against Michigan State. In the first season of official NCAA attendance records (1949), the final tally showed Michigan leading the nation in average home attendance with 93,894. Seven years would pass before the capacity of Michigan Stadium was raised again with the building of the Michigan Sports Communications Center (press box). Built at a cost of $700,000, the structure provided a host of resources, including a press area, a photo deck, darkrooms and various other amenities. Dedicated on Sept. 22, 1956, the press box and the additional seating constructed along with it increased the capacity of Michigan Stadium to 101,001. This began a tradition of ending all Michigan Stadium capacity numbers with the digit “1”, the extra seat being in honor of Fritz Crisler, the director of athletics at the time. On Oct. 6, 1956, Michigan Stadium hosted over 100,000 people for the first time as a capacity crowd saw Michigan State defeat Michigan, 9-0. Though the Michigan football team suffered some lean years in the 1960s, the Ann Arbor faithful still packed the stadium to the point where

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HISTORY between 1959 and 1971, Michigan finished no lower than fifth in the nation in average attendance. During this period, major changes continued. In 1965, the benches were redone in blue fiberglass to prevent weathering and discoloration of the seats. It was then that the yellow “Block M” was created on the east bleachers of the stadium, a design done by former U-M player Dan Dworsky. In August of 1968, at a cost of $75,000, both scoreboards were replaced after 38 years of service. The new scoreboards added the number of time outs left for each team as well as the spot the ball was on, in addition to the features given on the old boards. These scoreboards, measuring 41 feet by 16 feet, were in use at the north and south ends of the stadium until 1998. Based on evidence that artificial turf could withstand any type of weather and required less maintenance than grass, the Regents of the University of Michigan approved the installation of artificial turf at Michigan Stadium. In July 1969, a total of 88,285 feet of Tartan Turf were installed at a cost of $250,000. In its first game on the new surface, Michigan defeated Vanderbilt, 42-14. However, the Wolverines would drop their next home contest, 40-17 to Missouri on Oct. 4, 1969. After this defeat, Michigan would not lose at home again until Nov. 22, 1975 – a span of 41 games. In the summer of 1973, renovations called for the removal of many of the rails in the stadium and replacement of the box seats in the first three rows with bleacher seats. This change allowed for 600 more seats in the stadium, raising capacity to 101,701. In 1974, Michigan led the nation in average attendance, as it has done every season since, except 1997. Another game of note in the 1970s was U-M’s shutout of Purdue on Nov. 8, 1975. That day, 102,415 fans witnessed the beginning of a streak in which Michigan has played every home game in front of more than 100,000 fans, a streak that continues into the 2009 season. Michigan resurfaced the field with artificial turf in 1975 and 1982. When the time to do so arose again in 1990, a decision was made to return to a natural surface in time for the 1991 season. Michigan played its last home game on artificial surface against Minnesota on Nov. 17, 1990, winning, 35-18. The Wolverines’ artificial turf home record was an impressive 119-18-3 over 22 seasons. In May of 1991, 87,000 feet of prescription athletic turf were installed in a comprehensive renovation of Michigan Stadium. In addition to returning to natural grass, the field was lowered by three and a half feet to facilitate sightlines in the lower rows. The bill for these improvements came to $2.25 million. Included was the addition of two rows to the lower seating area of the stadium, raising capacity to 102,501. As Michigan closed out the 1993 season against Ohio State, 106,867 fans filled the stadium, breaking both the Michigan Stadium and NCAA single-game attendance records. The number of people in Michigan Stadium exceeded the population of all but 185 cities in the United States and increased the Wolverine season tally to 739,560, a thenNCAA record. The stadium continues to undergo changes. Prior to the 1996 season, the surface was torn up and the field crowned to allow for better drainage. Prior to Michigan’s 1997 game against Ohio State, the University of Michigan Board of Regents approved the expansion of Michigan Stadium that added seats around the stadium and video scoreboards in each end zone. During the 1997 national championship season, the schedule was highlighted by the 17th seven-game home slate in Michigan Football history. A single-game Michigan Stadium record crowd of 106,867 fans witnessed the Wolverines’ 20-14 victory over Ohio State that clinched the Big Ten title and subsequent Rose Bowl berth. That game closed out a 7-0 home slate that saw Michigan draw another NCAA record of 745,139 fans (106,448 per game average.) Michigan continued to rewrite the NCAA record books in 1998, setting single-game and season attendance marks. Construction was completed on the stadium prior to the season-opener that increased capacity to

May 1991 / Michigan Stadium returns to grass as 87,000 feet of Prescription Athletic Turf is installed. Eight thousand square yards of sod were brought in for the playing surface which is lowered 3 1/2 feet to facilitate better sightlines for those seated in lower rows. The conversion from turf back to grass costs $2,250,000. The rows in Michigan Stadium number 91, up from the 90 rows Michigan maintained since the 1950s. September 14 / Michigan plays on grass on its field for the first time since 1968 in a 24-14 win over Notre Dame. October 19 / Michigan draws 106,097 to its homecoming game against Indiana, the 100th consecutive home crowd over 100,000. 1992 / After nearly 20 years of constant capacity, Michigan Stadium begins the 1992 campaign with space for 800 more fans, now totaling 102,501. Another row is added, giving it the 92 that it still has today. November 20, 1993 / Michigan sets a stadium and then-NCAA record with a crowd of 106,867 for the Ohio State game. This gives U-M a season home attendance total of 739,560, an NCAA record, breaking its own record from 1987. November 12, 1994 / Michigan ends the home season with a crowd of 105,624 against Minnesota. The season average for the six Wolverine home games is 106,217, breaking the 1992 NCAA mark. 1996 / Despite being overshadowed by Tennessee’s expanded Neyland Stadium, Michigan averages 105,933 fans per game, leading the nation for the 23rd consecutive season. 1997 / Varsity Plaza is added, as well as brick and wrought iron fencing around the stadium concourse. November 22 / Michigan sets a then single-game attendance record at the “Big House” as a crowd of 106,867 witness a 20-14 victory over Ohio State that clinched the Big Ten title and Rose Bowl berth. The attendance total surpassed the Wolverines’ previous NCAA record as 745,139 fans (106,448 per game average) attended the seven home games. 1998 / Michigan Stadium undergoes renovations that add 5,000 seats around the stadium (107,501) and two video scoreboards in each end zone. The Wolverine brick plaza is completed at the northwest entrance. September 26 / Michigan sets an NCAA single-game attendance mark (111,238) at the 29-17 win over Michigan State in the Big Ten opener. November 14 / The Wolverines complete the six-game home schedule against Wisconsin, drawing 111,217 fans. The second-largest crowd in stadium history helps Michigan set an NCAA season average of 110,965 fans per game (665,787 total). September 4, 1999 / Michigan sets the NCAA single-game attendance record (111,523) for the season-opening 26-22 victory over Notre Dame. The mark breaks the previous NCAA record set by U-M on Sept. 26, 1998. September 11 / The Wolverines play their 150th consecutive home game in front of at least 100,000 fans. Michigan defeats Rice, 37-3 (110,501). November 20 / Michigan sets a pair of NCAA records in the 24-17 victory over Ohio State. U-M breaks the single-game attendance record set against the Irish, with 111,575 fans. The crowd helps U-M set an NCAA season average record of 111,008 fans (666,049 total). 2001 / Michigan plays its 75th season at Michigan Stadium, compiling a 6-1 record. 2002 / The Board of Regents approve the expansion of a new home locker-

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HISTORY room (Nov. 12) and an artificial surface field (Dec. 12) at Michigan Stadium. 2003 / The new team lockerroom, designed by Rosetti Architects in Birmingham, Mich., provides U-M with improved medical facilities and an area where all players can dress at the stadium. The 10,208-square-foot facility is three times larger than the previous locker room (3,145 square feet) and costs $3 million. April 28 - Early July / The field at Michigan Stadium returns to an artificial surface as FieldTurf replaces the Prescription Athletic Turf (PAT) that had been in place since 1991. The surface cost $620,000 to install, with the fee including removal of the existing surface, installation of the new field and replacement of the urethane track around the field and tunnel. It also included a $46,000 donation by Ford Motor Company for the crushed rubber infill used in the field. September 13 / The Wolverines set the NCAA single-game attendance record as 111,726 fans witness a 38-0 shutout win against Notre Dame. November 22 / U-M sets the NCAA single-game attendance mark set earlier against the Irish as 112,118 are in attendance for the Big Ten title clinching 35-21 victory over Ohio State. U-M leads the nation in average attendance for the sixth straight season, with its seven-game total of 776,429 fans breaking the previous school-record (774,033 set in 2002). 2004 / The first of four phases of concrete restoration begins with the replacement of cement and bleachers in sections 28-33. The project costs $2 million. October 30 / Michigan rallies from a 17-point deficit with 6:28 remaining to defeat Michigan State in triple overtime, 45-37, in the longest game in Big Ten history. The crowd of 111,609 is the third-largest in stadium history. 2005 / The concrete and bleachers on the east side of the stadium (sections 6-40) is replaced at a cost of $2.75 million. 2006 / The cement and bleachers are replaced on the west side and in the south end zone, from sections 7-40 at a cost of $6.3 million. November 4 / U-M plays its 200th consecutive game with at least 100,000 fans. The Wolverines defeat Ball State, 34-26 (109,359). 2007 / The final section of the concrete and bleacher restoration, sections 34-39 in the north end zone, is completed at a cost of $2.5 million.

107,501. With the added seating, the Wolverines went on to again set an NCAA single-game attendance record with 111,238 vs. Michigan State on Sept. 26, 1998. U-M finished the six-game home slate in 1998 with a season average of 110,965 fans per game, breaking Tennessee’s NCAA record. The Wolverines had an average attendance of 110,576 fans at its seven home games during the 2002 season. The season total of 774,033 fans at the “Big House” set a new stadium record but ranked third in NCAA total attendance behind Penn State (857,911) and Ohio State (827,904), which both played eight home games. U-M had four crowds over 111,000, including the season’s largest attended game of 111,542 fans vs. Michigan State. U-M led the nation in average attendance for the 13th straight season and the 37th time in past 39 years in 2010. The Wolverines set the NCAA singlegame attendance mark twice during the 2003 season, first in a 38-0 shutout win against Notre Dame on Sept. 13 (111,726) and again before 112,118 spectators at the conference title-clinching 35-21 victory over Ohio State on Nov. 22 - the 100th game in the historic rivalry. U-M’s seven-game total of 776,429 fans broke the previous school-record mark of 774,033 patrons set in 2002. On Sept. 4, 2010, the Wolverines were proud to unveil their newly expanded and renovated Big House, hosting an NCAA record 109,901 fans in the seasonopening 30-10 victory over Connecticut. U-M averaged 111,825 fans during the seven-game home season in 2010, but added a very unique eighth game in the confines of the stadium on Dec. 11. The Michigan hockey team shut out rival Michigan State, 5-0, in The Big Chill at the Big House on Dec. 11, 2010, before a world record crowd of 113,411.

Summer / A $750,000 upgrade of the scoreboards includes light-emitting diode message banners. The incandescent bulbs used in the two scoreboards are also replaced with LED lights, which are easier to read and use less power. September 27, 2008 / U-M plays its 500th game in Michigan Stadium, recording the largest comeback in stadium history with a 27-25 win over Wisconsin. September 4, 2010 / Renovated stadium is rededicated in season-opener against Connecticut. With a new capacity of 109,901, it features additions to the east and west sides with club suites and seats, a second elevated concourse and additional concessions areas and restrooms. April 5, 2011 / U-M announces TS Sports/Lighthouse will provide new state-of-the-art video boards at Michigan Stadium. The boards will be 40 percent larger than the previous system at 47 feet x 85 feet and measuring more than 4,000 square feet each. The upgrade will be completed in August prior to the 2011 season-opener.

CONSECUTIVE 100,000+ CROWDS Nov. 8, 1975. Not many things have remained consistent since that Saturday 35 years ago. Nearly 33 percent of the United States population today was not even born when 102,415 fans filed into Michigan Stadium to begin a streak that continues on to the present day. Entering the 2010 season, Michigan has drawn in excess of 100,00 fans for 223 consecutive games at Michigan Stadium. Since 1975, 22,285,384 fans (106,300 avg.) have seen the Wolverines compile a record of 179-44-1 (.825).

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UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN HOME STADIUMS Stadium/Years ..................... Games ............. Record................ Capacity (Yr) Ann Arbor Sites/1883-1892..............18 ................... 17-1-0................................................. Regents Field/1893-1905 ..................92 ................... 87-2-3........................... 400 (1893) ........................................................................................................................................ 800 (1896) Ferry Field/1906-1926 ..................... 104 .................88-14-2..................... 18,000 (1906) .................................................................................................................................. 25,000 (1914) .................................................................................................................................. 40,000 (1921) .................................................................................................................................. 46,000 (1926) Michigan Stadium/1927-2010 ......... 519 ......... 384-120-15..................... 72,000 (1927) .................................................................................................................................. 84,401 (1927) .................................................................................................................................. 85,753 (1928) .................................................................................................................................. 97,239 (1949) ................................................................................................................................101,001 (1956) ................................................................................................................................101,701 (1973) ................................................................................................................................102,501 (1992) ................................................................................................................................107,501 (1998) ................................................................................................................................102,601 (2008) ................................................................................................................................109,901 (2010) Total Ann Arbor Record .................. 733 ......... 576-137-20................................................. In Detroit (1879-1901) ........................18 ................... 12-5-1................................................. Total Home Record ........................... 751 ......... 588-142-21................................................. HEAD COACHES RECORDS AT HOME Coach ............................Years ......................Games ........... Record .......... Pct. Mike Murphy & Frank Crawford ................. 1891...........................................4 ....................3-1-0 ............ .750 Frank Barbour ................... 1892-93 ....................................7 ....................5-2-0 ............ .714 William McCauley ............ 1894-95 .................................12 .................11-0-1 ............ .958 W. Douglas Ward.............. 1896...........................................6 ....................6-0-0 ..........1.000 Gustave Ferbert................ 1897-99 .................................19 .................18-0-1 ............ .974 Langdon Lea...................... 1900...........................................7 ....................6-0-1 ............ .929 Fielding Yost ...................... 1901-23, 25-26 ................ 144 ............129-13-2 ............ .903 George Little...................... 1924...........................................4 ....................3-1-0 ............ .750 Elton Wieman .................... 1927-28 .................................11 ....................7-4-0 ............ .636 Harry Kipke......................... 1929-37 .................................50 .............. 30-16-4 ............ .640 Fritz Crisler .......................... 1938-47 .................................57 .................46-8-3 ............ .833 Bennie Oosterbaan ......... 1948-58 .................................67 .............. 46-19-2 ............ .701 Bump Elliott ....................... 1959-68 .................................61 .............. 33-26-2 ............ .557 Bo Schembechler ............ 1969-89 .............................. 134 ............115-16-3 ............ .869 Gary Moeller ...................... 1990-94 .................................31 .................22-8-1 ............ .726 Lloyd Carr............................ 1995-2007 ............................86 .............. 74-12-0 ............ .860 Rich Rodriguez ................. 2008-10 .................................22 .............. 11-11-0 ............ .500 HOME GAME RECORDS Most Home Games, Season: 11, 1905 Since 1950: 7 (1955, 1956, 1961, 1963, 1971, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1979, 1984, 1987, 1993, 1995, 1997, 2002, 2003, 2006) Most Home Wins, Season: 11, 1905 Since 1950: 7 (1971, 1976, 1977, 1997, 2003, 2006) Most Home Losses, Season: 5 (2008) Most Home Ties, Season: 2 (1963, 1975) Undefeated Home Seasons: 54 (Last: 2006) Longest Home Winning Streak: 50 (1901-07) Since 1950: 28 Games, 1969-73 Longest Home Undefeated Streak: 95, 1893-07 Since 1950: 41 Games, 1969-75 Longest Home Losing Streak: 5, 1958-59; 2008

SINGLE GAME Most Points: 70 vs. Navy (1976) and Illinois (1981) Most Opponent Points: 51 by Florida Most Opponent Points including Overtime Games: 65 by Illinois (2010) Most Combined Points: 91 (Michigan 70, Illinois 21), 1981 Most Combined Points Including Overtime Games: 132 (Michigan 67, Illinois 65), 2010

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230 STRAIGHT The University of Michigan football team has played 230 consecutive home games in front of crowds in excess of 100,000 through the 2010 season. The last time Michigan did not have 100,000 in attendance in Michigan Stadium was on Oct. 25, 1975 vs. Indiana. A crowd of 93,857 was on hand for the 55-7 Michigan victory. Siince then, Michigan has set numerous NCAA attendance marks and the Wolverines have led the nation in attendance for 36 of the past 37 seasons. MICHIGAN STADIUM -- 1927-2010 (84 YEARS) Won 384, Lost 120, Tied 15 CAPACITY: 109,901 — The largest college-owned structures of its kind designed solely for football — closer to the playing field with no running track—no posts or other obstructions. COMPLETION: 1927 — At a cost in excess of $950,000 to seat 72,000 spectators. Capacity raised to 84,401 by addition of temporary wooden bleachers until 1949 when permanent steel stands replaced the wooden bleachers, increasing the capacity to 97,239. Seating capacity then raised to 101,001 in 1956, 101,701 in 1973, 102,501 in 1992, 107,501 in 1998 and 106,201 in 2008. FIRST GAME: October 1, 1927 — Led by captain Bennie Oosterbaan, U-M defeated Ohio Wesleyan, 33-0. LaVerne (Kip) Taylor, Michigan end, scored first in the stadium on a 28-yard pass from halfback Louis Gilbert. DEDICATION GAME: October 22, 1927 — Michigan defeated Ohio State, 21-0. ATTENDANCE: Since 1927 — 43,717,240 fans have watched the Wolverines play 519 games. Stadium attendance record of 113,090 set Sept. 4, 2010 against Connecticut. FIELD: 360 x 160 feet — Installed FieldTurf in 2003, returning Michigan to an artificial surface for the first time since the 1990 season. Installed Prescription Athletic Turf in 1991, giving Michigan its first natural grass field since 1968. Field was also lowered 3-1/2 feet allowing better sightlines for those seated in the lower rows. NOTES ON THE BUILDING OF MICHIGAN STADIUM • The number of tons of reinforcing steel used in the construction was estimated at 440 (880,000 pounds). • The 31,000 square feet of wire mesh used in building the stadium could, at that time, imprison all the inmates of Sing Sing, and the federal prisons of Atlanta and Leavenworth. • “Nature” Magazine estimated that it would take 14,000 woodchucks, working eight hour days, 11 1/2 months to move an amount of dirt equal to the 240,000 square yards that were excavated out of the Michigan Stadium site before the cement was poured. • 45,000,000 words were typed before the stadium was even authorized, and 4,500 yards of type were devoted to the construction process. Of these 4,500 yards of type, 3,000 were made up of adjectives. • It was estimated that there were 106,000,000 blades of grass making up the field at Michigan Stadium at the dedication game in 1927.

MICHIGAN STADIUM RECORDS Widest Margin of Victory: 69-0 vs. Northwestern, 1975 and Pittsburgh, 1947 Widest Margin of Defeat: 0-40 vs. Minnesota, 1935 MISCELLANEIOUS Won-Loss Record: 384-120-15 Last Tie Game: vs. Illinois, 1992 (22-22) Consecutive Wins: 28 (1969-1973)

132 YEARS

Consecutive Losses: 5 (1958-1959) SEASON Most Wins: 7 in 1971, 1976, 1977, 1997, 2003 Most Losses: 5 in 2008 Most Points: 317 in 1976 Fewest Points: 21 in 1934 Most Opponent Points: 253 in 2010 Fewest Opponent Points: 13 in 1932

MICHIGAN STADIUM

ANNUAL ATTENDANCE TOTALS / MICHIGAN STADIUM, 1927-2010 Year ...........Home.............Away ..............Total 1927 .......... 297,641 ............147,611 ............. 445,252 1928 .......... 261,900 ............100,872 ............. 362,772 1929 .......... 267,655 ............130,047 ............. 397,702 1930 .......... 234,395 ............112,372 ............. 346,767 1931 .......... 197,174 .............. 48,293 ............. 245,467 1932 .......... 144,295 .............. 75,906 ............. 220,201 1933 .......... 206,394 .............. 63,803 ............. 270,197 1934 .......... 122,526 ............140,268 ............. 262,794 1935 .......... 166,950 .............. 67,418 ............. 234,368 1936 .......... 146,797 ............127,987 ............. 274,784 1937 .......... 196,737 .............. 87,030 ............. 283,767 1938 .......... 241,873 ............147,886 ............. 389,759 1939 .......... 297,090 .............. 75,299 ............. 372,389 1940 .......... 243,287 ............195,677 ............. 438,964 1941 .......... 299,283 ............105,999 ............. 405,282 1942 .......... 206,135 ............175,284 ............. 381,419 1943 .......... 217,327 .............. 58,801 ............. 276,128 1944 .......... 178,664 ............159,628 ............. 338,292 1945 .......... 309,506 ............206,615 ............. 516,121 1946 .......... 514,598 ............138,211 ............. 652,809 1947* ........ 456,693 ............245,598 ............. 702,291 1948 .......... 408,057 ............241,357 ............. 649,414 1949 .......... 563,363 ............213,058 ............. 776,421 1950* ........ 492,867 ............299,691 ............. 792,558 1951 .......... 445,635 ............147,964 ............. 593,599 1952 .......... 395,907 ............146,541 ............. 542,448 1953 .......... 353,860 ............183,723 ............. 537,583 1954 .......... 410,017 ............146,495 ............. 556,512 1955 .......... 545,143 ............119,586 ............. 664,729 LARGEST STADIUM CROWDS 85,753 (1928-48) Game ............Year .....Attendance Notre Dame ...1943 ................. 86,408 Five times*......1946-47 .......... 85,938 Navy ..................1948 ................. 85,808 Twice !...............1948 ................. 85,782 Ohio State .......1945 ................. 85,200 * Army and Illinois-1946; Minnesota, Indiana, Ohio State-1947 ! Illinois, Northwestern in 1948 97,239 (1949-55) Game ............Year .....Attendance Ohio State .......1955 ................. 97,369 Army .................1955 ................. 97,366 Six times* ........1949,54,55..... 97,239 Mich. State......1950 ................. 96,602 Illinois ...............1950 ................. 96,517 * Michigan State, Army, Minnesota, Ohio State-1949; Michigan State1954 and 1955 101,001 (1956-72) Game ............Year .....Attendance Ohio State .......1971 ...............104,016 Mich. State......1972 ...............103,735 Ohio State .......1969 ...............103,588 Mich. State......1970 ...............103,580 Mich. State......1959 ...............103,234 101,701 (1973-91) Game ............Year .....Attendance Ohio State .......1979 ...............106,255 Mich. State......1988 ...............106,208 Mich. State......1990 ...............106,188

Year ...........Home.............Away ..............Total 1956 .......... 566,096 ............134,726 ............. 700,822 1957 .......... 504,879 ............154,978 ............. 659,857 1958 .......... 405,066 ............189,694 ............. 594,760 1959 .......... 457,963 ............125,021 ............. 582,984 1960 .......... 375,232 ............217,226 ............. 592,458 1961 .......... 506,891 ............104,077 ............. 610,968 1962 .......... 310,065 ............261,637 ............. 571,702 1963 .......... 400,637 ............117,917 ............. 518,554 1964* ........ 380,309 ............320,133 ............. 700,442 1965 .......... 474,651 ............189,662 ............. 664,313 1966 .......... 413,599 ............255,399 ............. 668,998 1967 .......... 447,029 ............179,997 ............. 627,026 1968 .......... 407,948 ............202,423 ............. 610,371 1969* ........ 428,780 ............308,525 ............. 737,305 1970 .......... 476,164 ............286,242 ............. 762,406 1971* ........ 564,376 ............335,149 ............. 899,525 1972 .......... 513,398 ............292,971 ............. 806,369 1973 .......... 595,171 ............231,288 ............. 826,459 1974 .......... 562,105 ............313,197 ............. 875,302 1975* ........ 689,146 ............317,373 ..........1,006,519 1976* ........ 722,113 ............322,067 ..........1,044,180 1977* ........ 729,418 ............356,140 ..........1,085,558 1978* ........ 629,697 ............409,219 ..........1,038,916 1979* ........ 730,315 ............319,917 ..........1,050,232 1980* ........ 625,861 ............430,693 ..........1,056,554 1981* ........ 632,990 ............369,986 ..........1,002,976 1982* ........ 631,743 ............423,684 ..........1,055,427 1983* ........ 626,916 ............411,344 ..........1,038,260 1984* ........ 726,734 ............316,442 ..........1,043,176

Ohio State .......1991 ...............106,156 Florida State...1991 ...............106,145 102,501 (1991-97) Game ............Year .....Attendance Ohio State .......1997 ...............106,982 Ohio State .......1993 ...............106,967 Notre Dame ...1993 ...............106,851 Penn State ......1994 ...............106,832 Mich. State......1992 ...............106,788 107,501 (1998-2007) Game ............Year .....Attendance Ohio State .......2003 ...............112,118 Ohio State .......2007 ...............111,941 Notre Dame ...2003 ...............111,726 Mich. State......2004 ...............111,609 Ohio State .......2005 ...............111,591 109,901 (2010-current) Game ............Year .....Attendance Connecticut ...2010 .............113,090* Michigan St. ...2010 ...............113,065 Iowa...................2010 ...............112,784 Wisconsin........2010 ...............112,276 Illinois ...............2010 ...............111,441 *NCAA regular-season record SEASON HOME AVERAGE Year ...............Games ..... Average 2010* ................7.......................111,825 2004 ..................6.......................111,025 1999 ..................6.......................111,008 1998 ..................6.......................110,965 2003 ..................7.......................110,918 2005 ..................7.......................110,915

Year ...........Home.............Away ..............Total 1985* ........ 633,530 ............431,765 ..........1,065,295 1986* ........ 631,261 ............477,102 ..........1,108,363 1987* ........ 731,281 ............308,797 ..........1,040,078 1988* ........ 628,807 ............413,466 ..........1,042,273 1989* ........ 632,135 ............428,032 ..........1,060,167 1990* ........ 627,046 ............373,113 ..........1,000,159 1991* ........ 632,024 ............385,348 ..........1,017,372 1992* ........ 635,201 ............375,497 ..........1,010,698 1993* ........ 739,560 ............349,027 ..........1,088,587 1994* ........ 637,300 ............398,633 ..........1,035,933 1995* ........ 726,370 ............395,257 ..........1,121,627 1996* ........ 635,589 ............331,682 ............. 967,271 1997* ........ 745,139 ............400,450 ..........1,145,589 1998* ........ 665,787 ............367,380 ..........1,096,751 1999* ........ 666,049 ............413,998 ..........1,080,047 2000* ........ 664,930 ............441,534 ..........1,106,464 2001* ........ 659,447 ............466,944 ..........1,126,391 2002* ........ 774,033 ............436,871 ..........1,210,904 2003* ........ 776,429 ............401,453 ..........1,177,882 2004* ........ 666,149 ............435,615 ..........1,101,764 2005* ........ 776,405 ............342,154 ..........1,118,559 2006* ........ 770,183 ............483,487 ..........1,253,670 2007* ......882,115‡ ............326,791 ..........1,208,906 2008 .......... 759,997 ............410,551 ..........1,170,548 2009 .......... 871,464 ............289,873 ..........1,161,337 2010 .......... 782,776 ............398,022 ..........1,249,123 * Includes Bowl game attendance ‡ Stadium Record/NCAA Record

2000 ..................6.......................110,822 2002 ..................7.......................110,576 2007 ..................8.......................110,264 2006 ..................7.......................110,026 2001 ..................6.......................109,908 2009 ..................8.......................108,933 2008 ..................7.......................108,571 1997 ..................7.......................106,448 1994 ..................6.......................106,217 1996 ..................6.......................105,932 1992 ..................6.......................105,867 1993 ..................7.......................105,651 1985 ..................6.......................105,588 1981 ..................6.......................105,498 1989 ..................6.......................105,356 1991 ..................6.......................105,337 1982 ..................6.......................105,290 1986 ..................6.......................105,210 1978 ..................6.......................104,949 1988 ..................6.......................104,801 1990 ..................6.......................104,508 1983 ..................6.......................104,486 1987 ..................7.......................104,469 1979 ..................7.......................104,331 1980 ..................6.......................104,310 1977 ..................7.......................104,203 1984 ..................7.......................103,819 1995 ..................7.......................103,767 1976 ..................7.......................103,159 1975 ..................7......................... 98,449 1949 ..................6......................... 93,894 *NCAA regular-season record

THE LEADERS & BEST

MICHIGAN STADIUM

ATTENDANCE

LARGEST ROAD CROWDS (Regular Season) Year ............... Site ......Attendance 2008 ...................Penn State ... 110,017 2006 ...................Penn State ... 110,007 2010 ...................Penn State ... 109,539 2001 ...................Penn State ... 107,879 2006 ...................Ohio State ... 105,708 2008 ...................Ohio State ... 105,564 2002 ...................Ohio State ... 105,539 2010 ...................Ohio State ... 105,491 2004 ...................Ohio State ... 105,456 2000 ...................Ohio State ......98,568 1997 ...................Penn State ......97,498 1999 ...................Penn State ......96,840 1993 ...................Penn State ......96,719 1995 ...................Penn State ......96,677 1992 ...................Ohio State ......95,330 1996 ...................Ohio State ......94,676 1998 ...................Ohio State ......94,339 1994 ...................Ohio State ......93,869 1986 ...................Ohio State ......90,674 1984 ...................Ohio State ......90,286 1982 ...................Ohio State ......90,252 1988 ...................Ohio State ......90,176 1990 ...................Ohio State ......90,054 1980 ...................Ohio State ......88,827 1978 ...................Ohio State ......88,358 1974 ...................Ohio State ......88,250 1976 ...................Ohio State ......88,250 2000 ...................UCLA.................88,044 1970 ...................Ohio State ......87,331 1949 ...................Stanford ..........87,123 1972 ...................Ohio State ......87,040 1968 ...................Ohio State ......85,371 1964 ...................Ohio State ......84,685

191

MICHIGAN STADIUM

MICHIGAN STADIUM

ATTENDANCE The Wolverine football program is in its 85th season in the "Big House" in 2010, with a 384-120-15 all-time record at Michigan Stadium. The largest college football stadium in the country, it was completed in 1927 at a cost of $950,000, initially seating 72,000 fans. Michigan won the first game played at Michigan Stadium, defeating Ohio Wesleyan, 33-0, on Oct. 1, 1927. The stadium was officially dedicated on Oct. 22, 1927, with a 21-0 shutout over Ohio State. Since that inaugural season, the capacity of Michigan Stadium has increased nine times to its present 109,901. The Wolverines have led the nation in attendance 37 times in the past 39 years, and reestablished the NCAA single-game attendance record at 113,090 fans during the 2010 rededication game against Connecticut. The Wolverines enter the 2011 season having drawn crowds of 100,000-plus for 230 consecutive games. On football Saturdays in Ann Arbor, Michigan Stadium ranks as the fourth-largest "city" in the state of Michigan, surpassing the population of Ann Arbor itself. Michigan Stadium was the only college-owned football facility with a video scoreboard above both end zones. It was also the first stadium to use electronic scoreboards for official time when, in 1930, two were installed. MICHIGAN’S NATIONAL ATTENDANCE RANKINGS 1949.....................First 1950.....................First 1951.............. Second 1952.............. Second 1953...................Third 1954.............. Second 1955.....................First 1956.............. Second 1957.....................First 1958.............. Second 1959.............. Second 1960...................Third 1961.............. Second 1962.................... Fifth 1963.................... Fifth 1964...................Third 1965.............. Second 1966...................Third 1967.............. Second 1968................Fourth 1969.............. Second 1970.............. Second 1971.............. Second 1972.....................First 1973.............. Second

1974.....................First 1975.....................First 1976.....................First 1977.....................First 1978.....................First 1979.....................First 1980.....................First 1981.....................First 1982.....................First 1983.....................First 1984.....................First 1985.....................First 1986.....................First 1987.....................First 1988.....................First 1989.....................First 1990.....................First 1991.....................First 1992.....................First 1993.....................First 1994.....................First 1995.....................First 1996.....................First 1997.............. Second 1998.....................First

1999.....................First 2000.....................First 2001.....................First 2002.....................First 2003.....................First 2004.....................First 2005.....................First 2006.....................First 2007.....................First 2008.....................First 2009.....................First 2010.....................First

MICHIGAN STADIUM SITUATIONAL ATTENDANCE Home Openers Att. .......... Opponent .......... Year 113,090...... Connecticut ..........2010 111,523...... Notre Dame...........1999 111,491...... Washington ...........2002 111,012...... Syracuse .................1998 110,971...... Northern Illinois ..2005 110,815...... Miami (Ohio) .........2004 110,637...... Central Michigan.2003 110,585...... Bowling Green .....2000 109,676...... Miami (Ohio) .........2001 109,668...... Vanderbilt ..............2006 Homecoming Games Att. .......... Opponent .......... Year 112,784...... Iowa .........................2010 111,518...... Minnesota..............2004 111,496...... Iowa .........................2002 111,468...... Purdue.....................1999 111,117...... Minnesota..............2005 110,909...... Indiana ....................2000 110, 888..... Purdue.....................2007 110,863...... Indiana ....................1998 110,450...... Purdue.....................2001 110,231...... Illinois ......................2003 Non-Conference Games Att. .......... Opponent .......... Year 113,090...... Connecticut ..........2010 111,726...... Notre Dame...........2003 111,523...... Notre Dame...........1999 111,491...... Washington ...........2002 111,386...... Notre Dame...........2005 111,178...... Notre Dame...........2007 111,012...... Syracuse .................1998 110,971...... Northern Illinois ..2005 110,815...... Miami (Ohio) .........2004 110,637...... Central Michigan.2003

Big Ten Conference Games (Prior to 1998) Att. .......... Opponent .......... Year 106,982...... Ohio State ..............1997 106,867...... Ohio State ..............1993 106,832...... Penn State .............1994 106,788...... Michigan State .....1992 106,579...... Minnesota..............1992 106,577...... Minnesota..............1997 106,505...... Iowa .........................1997 106,481...... Illinois ......................1992 106,385...... Illinois ......................1993 106,381...... Michigan State .....1996 Big Ten Conference Games (Since 1998 Expansion) Att. .......... Opponent .......... Year 112,118...... Ohio State ..............2003 111,941...... Ohio State ..............2007 111,609...... Michigan State .....2004 111,591...... Ohio State ..............2005 111,575...... Ohio State ..............1999 111,571...... Ohio State ..............2001 111,542...... Michigan State .....2002 111,518...... Minnesota..............2004 111,514...... Michigan State .....2000 111,502...... Penn State .............2002 Big Ten Home Openers Att. .......... Opponent .......... Year 113,065...... Michigan State .....2010 111,502...... Penn State .............2002 111,468...... Purdue.....................1999 111,428...... Iowa .........................2004 111,341...... Wisconsin ...............2000 111,310...... Penn State .............2007 111,238...... Michigan State .....1998 111,117...... Minnesota..............2005 111,058...... Wisconsin ...............2006 110,788...... Indiana ....................2003

NOTE: Based on average attendance per game. NCAA began compilation in 1949. 2010 HOME ATTENDANCE TOTALS

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

192

School ....................Games ................... Total ............Per Game MICHIGAN ....................... 7 .........................782,776.....................111,825 Ohio State ........................ 8 .........................842,221.....................105,278 Penn State........................ 7 .........................729,636.....................104,234 Alabama ........................... 7 .........................712,747.....................101,821 Texas .................................. 7 .........................704,580.....................100,654 Tennessee ........................ 7 .........................698,465....................... 99,781 Georgia ............................. 6 .........................556,476....................... 92,746 LSU ..................................... 7 .........................649,023....................... 92,718 Florida ............................... 7 .........................633,579....................... 90,511 Auburn .............................. 8 .........................688,692....................... 86,087 Nebraska .......................... 7 .........................599,648....................... 85,664 Oklahoma ........................ 6 .........................508,426....................... 84,738

13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Texas A&M ....................... 7 .........................577,338....................... 82,477 Notre Dame ..................... 7 .........................565,565....................... 80,795 Southern California ...... 6 .........................479,444....................... 79,907 Wisconsin ......................... 7 .........................559,035....................... 79,862 Clemson............................ 7 .........................542,280....................... 77,469 South Carolina................ 7 .........................536,675....................... 76,668 Michigan State ............... 7 .........................514,894....................... 73,556 Florida State .................... 7 .........................498,890....................... 71,270 Iowa.................................... 7 .........................494,095....................... 70,585 Arkansas ........................... 6 .........................413,591....................... 68,932 Washington ..................... 6 .........................397,581....................... 66,264 Virginia Tech .................... 7 .........................463,631....................... 66,233 Kentucky........................... 7 .........................462,488....................... 66,070

132 YEARS

MICHIGAN STADIUM

MICHIGAN STADIUM MILESTONE GAMES FIRST GAME Oct. 1, 1927 - Ohio Wesleyan W, 33-0 50TH GAME Nov. 2, 1935 - Pennsylvania W, 16-6 100TH GAME Sept. 15, 1945 - Great Lakes W, 27-2 200TH GAME Oct. 14, 1961 - Michigan State L, 0-28 250TH GAME Oct. 11, 1969 - Purdue W, 31-20 300TH GAME Sept. 24, 1977 - Navy W, 14-7 400TH GAME Sept. 11, 1993 - Notre Dame L, 23-27

500TH GAME Sept. 27, 2008 - Wisconsin W, 27-25 MICHIGAN STADIUM MILESTONE WINS FIRST WIN Oct. 1, 1927: Ohio Wesleyan, 33-0 50TH WIN Sept. 27, 1941: Michigan State, 19-7 100TH WIN Oct. 11, 1952: Indiana, 28-13 200TH WIN Oct. 18, 1975: Northwestern, 69-0 250TH WIN Oct. 27, 1984: Illinois, 26-18 300TH WIN Aug. 26, 1995: Virginia, 18-17 350TH WIN Oct. 25, 2003: Purdue, 31-3

EVOLUTION OF THE LARGEST MICHIGAN STADIUM CROWDS 17,483 Oct. 1, 1927 - Ohio Wesleyan 27,864 Oct. 8, 1927 - Michigan State 84,401 Oct. 22, 1927 - Ohio State 84,423 Nov. 19, 1927 - Minnesota 85,088 Oct. 19, 1929 - Ohio State 86,408 Oct. 9, 1943 - Notre Dame 87,782 Oct. 16, 1948 - Northwestern 97,239 * Sept. 24, 1949 - Michigan State 97,366 Oct. 8, 1955 - Army 97,369 Nov. 19, 1955 - Ohio State 101,001 # Oct. 6, 1956 - Michigan State 103,234 Oct. 3, 1959 - Michigan State 103,588 Nov. 22, 1969 - Ohio State 104,016 Nov. 20, 1971 - Ohio State 105,223

Nov. 24, 1973 - Ohio State 105,543 Nov. 22, 1975 - Ohio State 106,024 Nov. 19, 1977 - Ohio State 106,255 Nov. 17, 1979 - Ohio State 106,788 Oct. 10, 1992 - Michigan State 106,851 Sept. 11, 1993 - Notre Dame 106,867 Nov. 20, 1993 - Ohio State 106,982 Nov. 22, 1997 - Ohio State 111,012 Sept. 12, 1998 - Syracuse 111,238 Sept. 26, 1998 - Michigan State 111,523 Sept. 4, 1999 - Notre Dame 111,575 Nov. 20, 1999 - Ohio State 111,726 Sept. 13, 2003 - Notre Dame 112,118 Nov. 22, 2003 - Ohio State 113,090 Sept. 4, 2010 - Connecticut * Tied on eight occasions / # Tied twice

MICHIGAN STADIUM

MILESTONES

U-M RECORD VS. ALL OPPONENTS

AT MICHIGAN STADIUM School ......................... W ..... L ...... T.......... Pct. Air Force ............................. 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Albion .................................. 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Appalachian State .......... 0 ........1 .........0 ............ .000 Arizona ................................ 2 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Army .................................... 4 ........3 .........0 ............ .571 Ball State ............................ 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Baylor................................... 1 ........0 .........1 ............ .750 Boston College ................ 2 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Bowling Green ................. 2 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 California ............................ 2 ........1 .........0 ............ .667 Central Michigan ............ 3 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Chicago............................... 5 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Colorado............................. 2 ........1 .........0 ............ .667 Columbia............................ 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Connecticut ...................... 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Cornell ................................. 2 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Dartmouth ........................ 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Delaware State ................ 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Denison .............................. 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Duke..................................... 5 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Eastern Michigan ............ 6 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Florida State...................... 1 ........1 .........0 ............ .500 Georgia ............................... 1 ........1 .........0 ............ .500 Georgia Tech..................... 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Great Lakes........................ 2 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Harvard ............................... 2 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000

School ......................... W ..... L ...... T.......... Pct. Houston.............................. 3 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Illinois ................................. 29 ..... 10........1 ............ .738 Indiana ............................... 30 .......7 .........0 ............ .811 Iowa..................................... 22 .......5 .........3 ............ .783 Iowa Pre-Flight ................ 1 ........1 .........0 ............ .500 Kansas ................................. 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Long Beach State............ 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Maryland ............................ 3 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Massachusetts ................. 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Memphis ............................ 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Miami (Fla.) ........................ 1 ........1 .........0 ............ .500 Miami (Ohio)..................... 4 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Michigan State................ 33 ..... 18........3 ............ .639 Minnesota......................... 30 ..... 10........1 ............ .744 Missouri .............................. 2 ........2 .........0 ............ .500 Mt. Union ........................... 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Navy .................................... 11 .......3 .........0 ............ .786 School ......................... W ..... L ...... T.......... Pct. Nebraska ............................ 0 ........1 .........0 ............ .000 North Carolina ................. 0 ........1 .........0 ............ .000 Northern Illinois .............. 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Northwestern .................. 29 .......6 .........2 ............ .811 Notre Dame ...................... 8 ........6 .........0 ............ .571 Ohio State ......................... 21 ..... 18........3 ............ .536 Ohio Wesleyan ................. 1 ........1 .........0 ............ .500 Oklahoma State .............. 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000

THE LEADERS & BEST

School ......................... W ..... L ...... T.......... Pct. Oregon ................................ 3 ........1 .........0 ............ .750 Oregon State .................... 3 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Pennsylvania .................... 4 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Penn State ......................... 5 ........3 .........0 ............ .625 Pittsburgh .......................... 2 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Princeton............................ 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Purdue................................ 23 .......5 .........0 ............ .821 Rice ....................................... 2 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 San Diego State............... 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 South Carolina ................. 0 ........1 .........0 ............ .000 Southern California........ 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Southern Methodist ...... 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Stanford .............................. 3 ........1 .........1 ............ .700 Syracuse ............................. 0 ........1 .........0 ............ .000 Texas A&M ......................... 2 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Toledo.................................. 0 ........1 .........0 ............ .000 Tulane .................................. 2 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 UCLA .................................... 5 ........1 .........0 ............ .833 Utah...................................... 1 ........1 .........0 ............ .500 Vanderbilt .......................... 2 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Virginia ................................ 2 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Wake Forest ...................... 2 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Washington....................... 3 ........1 .........0 ............ .750 Washington State ........... 3 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Western Michigan .......... 4 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000 Wisconsin.......................... 22 .......6 .........0 ............ .786 Yale ....................................... 1 ........0 .........0 ..........1.000

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